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Farm to Fork

Published: June 17, 2010

A national TV personality, having hosted more than 1,500 episodes of cooking shows, Chef Emeril Lagasse is the proprietor of 13 restaurants across the country and author of numerous cookbooks. His latest collection of recipes, Farm to Fork: Cooking Local, Cooking Fresh, is now available at major bookstores and amazon.com.

Here’s a peek at what’s inside.

Rhubarb Strawberry Crisp

Rhubarb Strawberry Crisp


(Makes 6 to 8 servings)

“Rhubarb and strawberries is a classic duo that appears in farmers’ markets and grocery stores at the same time each year, letting us know that spring has officially arrived. Look for rhubarb stalks that are deep red and firm to the touch, and deep red berries that are firm, fragrant, and not bruised.” —Emeril Lagasse

  • 1 pound rhubarb, diced
  • 1 pound strawberries, halved or quartered if large
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 2/3 cup all purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup rolled oats
  • ¾ cup light brown sugar
  • 6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 375 F. Lightly grease deep dish pie pan or other shallow 1 ½- to 2-quart nonreactive baking dish and set aside.
Combine rhubarb, strawberries, sugar, cornstarch, and lemon juice in medium mixing bowl and toss to combine. Transfer to prepared baking dish and set aside while you prepare topping.

In bowl of electric mixer fitted with paddle, combine remaining ingredients and process on low speed until mixture is crumbly and coarse. Sprinkle topping over fruit and place the baking dish on low-sided baking sheet (to catch juices that may bubble over). Transfer to oven and bake until topping is golden brown, crisp, and juices are bubbly and glossy, 40 to 45 minutes.

Roasted Tomato Tapenade


(Makes 2 cups)

“I used heirloom Roma tomatoes for this recipe, but at the height of tomato season when there are so many varieties to choose from, I think just about any variety of small, sweet tomato will work well here. Roasted tomatoes have a concentrated flavor, so remember, the better the tomato, the better the flavor. Use this tapenade as a spread for roasted vegetable sandwiches, tossed with pasta and olive oil for a quick pasta sauce, or on crostini for a quick hors d’oeuvre.” —Emeril Lagasse

  • 1 ½ pounds roma or plum tomatoes, cut in half lengthwise, seeds removed
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 sprigs each, thyme, rosemary, and marjoram
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup finely chopped kalamata olives, (about 10 olives)

Preheat oven to 450 F.

In medium size mixing bowl, combine tomatoes, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt and pepper. Arrange herbs on baking sheet or shallow baking dish. Dot inside of each tomato half with some garlic. Lay tomatoes, cut-sides down, on top of herbs. Roast tomatoes for 20 minutes, or until skins are crackly. Remove tomatoes from oven and set aside until cool enough to handle. Place tomato halves and garlic on a cutting board. Discard the whole herb sprigs. Add any juices, garlic, and herb leaves that remain on pan to cutting board with tomatoes. Run knife over tomatoes three or four times in chopping motion until tomatoes are uniformly chopped. Transfer to small bowl. Stir in vinegar, olives, and remaining tablespoon olive oil. Transfer to nonreactive container, cover, and refrigerate until ready to use. Tapenade will keep up to 1 week in refrigerator.

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  • Frank James Davis

    Both these dishes sound delicious and seem quite nutritious.
    While I read many recipes, I never prepare any of them. Occasionally, after scanning lists of tasty ingredients, I get a little hungry and scramble myself a few eggs–which is exactly what I’m going to do, right now.