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Five Grain Salad

Published: October 25, 2012

There are numerous health benefits to eating whole grains: They are low in fat, high in fiber, and one of nature’s superfoods. They have a long culinary history: Amaranth and quinoa are American heritage grains that were eaten by the Aztecs and Incas respectively.

Today these grains are widely cultivated and prized in the kitchen, not only for their nutritional value but also for their flavor and versatility.


Five Grain Salad


(Makes 6 cups, about 6 servings)
Emeril Lagasse's Five Grain Salad

Photo by Steven Freeman. Reprinted from Emeril at the Grill, HarperCollins Publisher, New York, © 2009 MSLO Inc. All rights reserved.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked wild rice (scroll down or click here for cooking directions)
  • 1 cup cooked amaranth (scroll down or click here for cooking directions)
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa (scroll down or click here for cooking directions)
  • 1 cup cooked millet (scroll down or click here for cooking directions)
  • 1 cup cooked brown Jasmati, brown basmati, or brown jasmine rice (cooked according to package)
  • 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
  • 1 cup fresh orange segments
  • 1 cup diced fennel (small dice)
  • ½ cup diced radishes (small dice)
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh fennel fronds
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Combine all ingredients in large bowl. Refrigerate, covered, for at least 1 hour or as long as 3 to 4 days before serving. Remove from refrigerator and serve at room temperature.


Wild Rice

Ingredients

(Makes 2 cups)

  • ½ cup wild rice
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt

Directions

  1. Combine ingredients in medium saucepan and bring to boil. Stir, cover pan, and reduce heat to simmer. Cook until all liquid has been absorbed, 50 to 55 minutes.
  2. Remove pan from heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes.
  3. Fluff rice with fork, adjust seasoning if necessary, and use as desired.


Amaranth

Ingredients

(Makes 1 ½ cups)

  • 1 cup amaranth seeds
  • 1 cup vegetable stock or canned low-sodium vegetable broth
  • Pinch of salt

Directions

  1. Place small saucepan over medium-high heat, and add amaranth. Toast until it begins to pop, 4 to 5 minutes.
  2. While amaranth is cooking, bring stock to boil in medium saucepan.
  3. Add amaranth and salt to stock. Cover pan, reduce heat, and simmer until all liquid has been absorbed, 7 minutes.
  4. Remove pan from heat and set aside, still covered, to steam for 7 minutes.
  5. Pour amaranth into bowl and use as desired.


Quinoa

Ingredients

(Makes 2 cups)

  • 1 cup vegetable stock or canned low-sodium vegetable broth
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup quinoa

Directions

  1. Combine stock, salt, and pepper in medium saucepan and bring to boil over high heat. Add quinoa, cover pan, and reduce heat. Simmer quinoa until all liquid has been absorbed, 12 minutes.
  2. Remove pan from heat and let stand, still covered, for 5 minutes.
  3. Fluff quinoa with fork, and use as desired.


Millet

Ingredients

(Makes 2 cups)

  • ½ cup hulled millet
  • 1 cup vegetable stock or canned low-sodium vegetable broth
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Place small saucepan over medium-high heat, and add millet. Toast until it has a nutty smell, 4 to 5 minutes.
  2. As soon as first grain pops, remove pan from heat and pour millet into bowl. Add cold water and swirl to wash millet. Then pour millet into fine-mesh sieve and rinse under cold running water for another minute or until water runs clear.
  3. Bring stock to boil in medium saucepan. Add millet and salt and pepper to taste, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, until all liquid has been absorbed, 20 minutes.
  4. Remove pan from heat and let stand, still covered, for 5 minutes.
  5. Fluff millet with fork, and use as desired.

Recipe courtesy of Emeril Lagasse, adapted from Emeril at the Grill, HarperCollins Publisher, New York, 2009, copyright MSLO Inc.

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