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Vintage Auto Ads: Chrysler

Published: September 3, 2015

Walter P. Chrysler started his career at 17 as a railroad mechanic whose engineering skills enabled him to rise through the ranks at several railroad companies. In 1912, an interest in automobiles led him to accept a job with General Motors as Buick’s production manager at age 36.

Eight years later, fed up with General Motors’ management, Chrysler quit Buick. He acquired a controlling interest in the ailing Maxwell Motor Company and, within a few years, had repositioned the company, given it his own name, and produced his first model.

Recognizing the wisdom of offering models in several price ranges, he soon launched the mid-priced DeSoto division and the economy-model Plymouth. And in 1928, he made his company one of the industry leaders by purchasing the Dodge Brothers operation. (For more on the auto industry’s early years, check out Post‘s new special collector’s edition, Automobiles in America!)

Chrysler’s first model offered several attractions to buyers. Its powerful, six-cylinder engine could achieve speeds of 70 mph using just 20 miles per gallon. The Chrysler Six also featured aluminum pistons, replaceable oil and air filters, shock absorbers, and standard-equipment hydraulic brakes on all wheels.

February 2, 1924

February 2, 1924


Two years later, Chrysler entered the luxury car market with his Imperial Series 80. The number referred to the fact that the Imperial’s slightly larger six-cylinder engine enabled the car to travel for hours at 80 mph.

June 5, 1926

June 5, 1926


The Imperial was redesigned in 1931 to include a straight-eight cylinder engine and wire wheels as standard issue.

April 11, 1931

April 11, 1931


Floating Power was Chrysler’s new engine mount, which reduced vibration.

February 20, 1932

February 20, 1932


The Airflow was an abrupt departure from traditional design. The innovative design was intended to reduce wind resistance, and incorporate the art deco style that was popular in the 1930s. Some of its features, such as its repositioned engine and passenger compartment, have since become standards of auto design. But it proved a little too up-to-date for buyers. Sales were disappointing and the Airflow as discontinued in 1937.

January 13, 1934

January 13, 1934


After the Airflow’s failure, Chrysler carefully avoided innovative designs. But while the car bodies rarely strayed from the boxy look, the company introduced an innovative engine design with hemispheric cylinder heads, which came to be known as the Hemi.

November 14, 1953

November 14, 1953


With sales falling farther behind Chevrolet and Ford, Chrysler had to do something different. So the following year, Chrysler introduced more modern, streamlined shapes that they called the Forward Look.

March 26, 1955

March 26, 1955


Chrysler styling grew even more progressive in the following years. The car in this advertisement from 1957, shows the start of rising tail fins, which would grow even more pronounced in following years. The company claimed the exaggerated fins were helpful in managing cars traveling at high speeds.

August 24, 1957

August 24, 1957


In the late 1960s, Chrysler introduced “fuselage” styling with sleek, rounded car bodies similar to jet airplanes. The interior, or “cockpit” according to Chrysler ads, was built to curve around the driver in a continual fluid line with all controls within easy reach.

October 19, 1968

October 19, 1968


The 1973 oil crisis sparked a demand for smaller, more fuel-efficient cars. But Chrysler ignored the trend to produce a new, personal luxury coupe, the Cordoba. In an otherwise bad year for the company, the Cordoba proved a strong seller. (The TV ads for Cordoba featured Ricardo Montalbán, whose carefully enunciated “soft Corinthian leather” was one of the most imitated commercial lines of the year.)

March 1, 1975

March 1, 1975


By 1976, Chrysler boosted sales of the New Yorker series by giving it the front, rear, and interior of the recently discontinued Imperial. At least one author has declared the New Yorker Brougham “the epitome of 1970s luxury.”

December 1, 1975

December 1, 1975


Recognizing the demand for smaller cars, Chrysler produced a modest version of its New Yorker, which it called its E-class. It looked like an elongated version of Chrysler’s economy model, the K-car. But the market wasn’t interested in Chrysler’s scaled-back luxury, and the E-Class was E-liminated in 1984.

December 1, 1982

December 1, 1982


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  • This is just the latest great installment on the American auto and the ads for them that ran in the POST during the 1900’s. Please continue them covering more car divisions from Ford, GM and Chrysler.

    The Chrysler ads here from the 20’s are great, but the colorful 1931’s are a real knockout, and the ’32 with the green and brown ‘two-tone’ color scheme is a real head turner too.

    The ‘Airflow’ was the forerunner of the later ‘Forward Look’ in many ways. Even if it didn’t go over that well with the public, it was still cutting edge for the time and very innovative.

    The 1954 and ’55 models are beautiful, and the ’57s (from Plymouth to Chrysler) were SO forward looking they threw industry leader GM into such a tailspin they were forced to COMPLETELY re-do their ’59 car lines during ’57 with no time to spare, and pulled it off in the nick of time without a hitch.

    The ’69 (’68 ad) is a beauty too. Love the fact it’s an open ‘coupe’ even though it’s a four door. The ’75 Cordoba was Chrysler’s ‘challenger’ to GM’s hot selling Monte Carlo and Grand Prix personal luxury coupes. In many ways it was a clever combination of those two in the front and back ends (including the hood and trunk), yet had a look all its own.

    The ’76 New Yorker POST ad is one of the most beautiful featured here, and one of the very last years of the sleek grand scale American cars available with the clean, non-pillared 2 or 4 door models. The ’82 ad represents one of the early years of the the very limited body style availability we’ve had ever since, from all auto companies.