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Cover Gallery: Let It Snow!

Published: December 21, 2016

The Saturday Evening Post loves a beautiful snowy day! (As long as we don’t have to drive anywhere. And it doesn’t turn to ice. And it’s not too cold. And it won’t last three more months. You get the idea.) Depending on your attitude toward frozen water, you’ll either love or loathe our cover gallery of winter fun, all from Post issues published before 1920.

November Special 1900 George Gibbs November 24, 1900

November Special 1900
George Gibbs
November 24, 1900

Child with Umbrella in Snow Henrietta Adams January 23, 1909

Child with Umbrella in Snow
Henrietta Adams
January 23, 1909

Snowball Fight at Snowfort J. C. Leyendecker February 25, 1911

Snowball Fight at Snowfort
J. C. Leyendecker
February 25, 1911

Woman Sledder Clarence F. Underwood March 4, 1911

Woman Sledder
Clarence F. Underwood
March 4, 1911

Fur Muff Penrhyn Stanlaws January 10, 1914

Fur Muff
Penrhyn Stanlaws
January 10, 1914

Building Snowman Sarah Stilwell-Weber February 10, 1917

Building Snowman
Sarah Stilwell-Weber
February 10, 1917

Piggyback Ride Sarah Stilwell-Weber January 25, 1919

Piggyback Ride
Sarah Stilwell-Weber
January 25, 1919

Gramps and the Snowman Norman Rockwell December 20, 1919

Gramps and the Snowman
Norman Rockwell
December 20, 1919

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  • Jennifer Bortel

    Hi Lynn,

    “The Perfect Squelch” was indeed a Saturday Evening Post feature. It appears to have run in the magazine from 1948 to 2009.

  • Lynn Anderson

    I’ve been telling friends that my favorite feature of the Post when I was a child was a regular box titled “The Percect Squelch” but I can’t find reference to it anywhere on your site. Could I be mistaken? Could it have been in another
    magazine?

  • All beautiful selections. It’s interesting to see the POST logo in 1900 before it was further honed and tweaked. I love the snowball fight cover from 1911, partly because it has a dog in it which were featured on many covers in the the first half of the century. I love dogs.

    The snowman’s face on the bottom is wonderful. Grandpa seems to like it. The three children on the ‘building a snowman’ cover look eerily modern for 100 years ago!! Remember when 100 years ago was the 1870’s, in the covered wagon era of ‘Little House on the Prairie’? Not anymore. We’re up to World War I.