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Most Popular Post Classic Fiction of 2016

Published: December 27, 2016

In the Saturday Evening Post’s nearly 200-year history, we have published some amazing fiction by prominent authors. Here is a list of the short stories you visited most often in 2016.

1. “Miss Temptation” by Kurt Vonnegut

A soldier just back from Korea disrupts a small town’s daily ritual—and makes a pretty girl cry—in Kurt Vonnegut’s well-loved short story. Read more »

2. “The Happiness Machine” by Ray Bradbury

It was the most incredible apparatus ever built. But not even the inventor knew the amazing things it could do…Read more »

Image of C.S. Lewis

3. “Screwtape Proposes A Toast” by C.S. Lewis

Written in 1959 by C.S. Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) of The Chronicles of Narnia fame, “Screwtape Proposes a Toast” is a follow-up to his very popular Screwtape Letters. Read more »

4. “The No-Talent Kid” by Kurt Vonnegut

Nothing could shake Walter’s determination to get into the marching band. So how could his conductor tell him how misplaced his ambition was? Read more »

An old mansion with specters floating about.

5. ”The Bus” by Shirley Jackson

Everyone knows you can’t go home again; but every once in a while, in a terrible nightmare, you are there. Read more »

An old mansion with specters floating about.

6. “The Kid Nobody Could Handle” by Kurt Vonnegut

What this town needed was some excitement, and Jim knew just how to provide it. Read more »

An old mansion with specters floating about.

7. “Sucker” by Carson McCullers

What this town needed was some excitement, and Jim knew just how to provide it. Read more »

Woman, man and child riding on a motorcycle

8. “The Actress and the Cop” by William Saroyan

Romance from the archive: His business was chasing lawbreakers. Then, one day, he became involved in an escapade with a glamorous Hollywood star. Read this 1957 novelette by William Saroyan. Read more »

Catholic bishop listening to cardinal

9. “The Bishop’s Beggar” by Stephen Vincent Benét

From the Post archive, a timeless tale from one of America’s greatest storytellers.
Read more »

An African-American woman sits before a judge

10. “The Conscience of the Court” by Zora Neale Hurston

In 1950s Jacksonville, Laura Lee Kimble stands accused of beating a man nearly to death. Author Zora Neale Hurston tells her story of speaking truth to power.
Read more »

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