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Cover Collection: Bold Women

Published: January 10, 2018

As Laurel Thatcher Ulrich once said, “Well-behaved women seldom make history.” This collection of Saturday Evening Post images is a paean to strong women making a difference.

Cover

Woman on Horseback
Philip R. Goodwin
June 9, 1906
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This cover illustrated a short story called “The Noose.” The cowgirl at the center of the story, Fan Blondell, “was already aware of her power, too, and walked among the rough men of her acquaintance with the step of an Amazonian queen, unafraid, unabashed.”

Cover

Woman with Egyptian Artifacts
J.C. Leyendecker
March 18, 1905
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In the short story, “The Swastika” by Robert W. Chambers, stenographer Miss Grey turns out to have deeper knowledge and more intrigue than her employer expected. J.C. Leyendecker, one of the Post’s most highly regarded artists, created this Egyptian-themed cover to illustrate the story.

Illustration

Her Big Moment
Joe De Mers
December 1, 1956
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Artist Joe De Mers illustrated “Her Big Moment” by Lee McGiffin. In it, four accomplished women return to their college reunion. De Mers captures the sleek glamour of the 1950s.

Illustration

Petticoat Empire
Gilbert Bundy
May 26, 1951
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This illustration accompanies a short story called “Petticoat Empire” by Edith Embury. In the story, Nathalie Wyman is a film producer: “She was the boss, the genius. No one ever disagreed with her — not if he wanted to keep his job.”

Cover

Woman in Showroom
Coby Whitmore
January 5, 1952
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Artist Coby Whitmore was well known for his illustrations of confident women. This woman looks like she has already picked out her 1952 model, and will be shortly driving it off the showroom floor. It comes as no surprise that Whitmore had a fascination with cars. In the early 1950s, he designed the Fitch-Whitmore Le Mans Special with racecar driver John Fitch.

Cover

Saying Grace
Norman Rockwell
November 24, 1951
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Boldness comes in all shapes and sizes; sometimes it means doing what you believe even when those around you don’t quite understand.

Cover

Rosie the Riveter
Norman Rockwell
May 29, 1943
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No gallery of bold women would be complete without Norman Rockwell’s beloved Rosie the Riveter. The model was Mary Doyle Keefe, a 19-year-old phone operator in Arlington, Vermont. During World War II, Rosie the Riveter toured the country raising money for the war bond drive. “I was very pleased that they could make all this money for the war.” Keefe said. “I am proud of this painting. It’s a symbol of what the women did for the war, to do their part.”

Cover

Target Practice
Ellen Pyle
October 8, 1927
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After her husband died, Ellen Pyle turned to painting to support her family. Her sister-in-law sent three of Ellen’s illustrations to The Saturday Evening Post in 1922, two of which were immediately selected by The Post’s famous editor, George Horace Lorimer. Over the course of the next decade-and-a-half, Pyle completed 40 covers for The Saturday Evening Post, including this archer.

Cover

Motor Corps Woman
J.C. Leyendecker
August 17, 1918
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The American Red Cross Motor Corps were a group of women who aided the U.S. military in transporting troops and supplies during World War I. These women did everything from running canteens and military hospitals to caring for patients of the 1918 flu pandemic.

Cover

Woman Pilot
Neysa McMein
August 11, 1917
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Artist Neysa McMein was involved in the war efforts during World War I, travelling through Europe with Dorothy Parker to entertain the troops. She painted a number of wartime covers, including this pilot.

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  • Very nice collection. Although i did not agree with your article title. But i love Ellen Pyle painting.

  • They really are bold women, especially the two painted BY female artists Ellen Pyle and Neysa McMein. The Motor Corps Woman, Rosie the Riveter for the war efforts, the elderly woman setting a good example of saying grace before a meal while traveling…

    The woman on horseback is blazing her own trail on the frontier, while the lady boss in ‘Petticoat Empire’ is obviously not happy with her male employees (script ?) and demanding a re-write after a lot of work apparently had already gone into it.

    ‘Woman in Showroom’ knows what she wants. The ’52 cars drawn here are kind of a clever composite of the Big 3. The one cover I found the most fascinating is Leyendecker’s ‘Woman With Egyptian Artifacts’. It’s beautiful, but extremely unusual. I’d never seen it before, and it doesn’t really “look like a Leyendecker” even though it is. That’s also true with some Rockwell’s here and there as well.