The Saturday Evening Post July/August Cover Interview Helen Mirren

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Shawna Seldon
917.971.7852
Shawna@rosengrouppr.com

July/August 2013 cover of The Saturday Evening Post

Indianapolis (June 24, 2013) — Time hasn’t dimmed the cool beauty of Academy Award-Winning actress, Helen Mirren. The 67-year-old is at the top of her game having played countless amazing roles, including her surprising part as a skilled assassin in the Red movies alongside Bruce Willis, John Malkovich and Catherine Zeta-Jones. (Red2 premieres July 18.) In the July/August issue of The Saturday Evening Post, on newsstands now, contributor Jeanne Wolf gets this unexpected action hero to open up about everything from her relationship to her career to her hobbies.

On guns and whether she is a good shot: “Really, I’m not a fan of guns. In fact, I don’t even own a gun. I’m not too sure that guns nowadays are that useful…I like target practice, especially clay pigeon shooting, which is very difficult. That’s a great sport. So I’m up for shooting at a target just not a human being.”

On her crush on Red co-star Bruce Willis: “Don’t let my husband [Oscar-winning director Taylor Hackford] know. I’m joking. My husband knows that I do have a crush on Bruce. Actually, I have two kinds: The classic fan crush and a more aesthetic one as an actress looking at an actor who I think is really wonderful, it’s the venal and the respectful.”

On tackling nude scenes when acting: “I think it’s worse when you’re young to do nude scenes, funnily enough, because you’re more of a sex object. It’s never comfortable. The best thing would be if all the crew took their clothes off too, and then you’d feel fine. But if my body is still holding up, it’s not because I’m a fitness person. I’m really not. I constantly feel guilty about the fact that I am not going to the gym.”

On deciding to become an actress: “I made my debut as the Virgin Mary when I was 7, and I loved it because I got to wear a nice dress. When I was 15 I was like ‘I’m ready, I’m here, where are you all?’ But it took a long time.”

On the secret to her relationship: “Loyalty, love, and respect works every time. We’re there to support each other and say to each other, ‘You’re fantastic,’ even if everyone else says you’re terrible. It sounds pathetic but we’re really very proud of each other’s work. Hollywood is very much about optimism.”

On what she enjoys in her free time: “I’ve been sewing. I love sewing. I get my mum’s very old Singer treadle machine out. It badly needs a renovation. Anyway I just made myself a new gown to wear in my dressing room.”

The full interview is available online at www.saturdayeveningpost.com/helen-mirren. For more information, please contact Shawna Seldon at The Rosen Group at 917.971.7852
or Shawna@rosengrouppr.com.

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