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1945_07_21--009-160 Miles of Words

Pyroil adds life to pliton your car! r- PYROIL COMPANY 974 Mein Street, LaCrosse, Wisconsin I want my car to last and run properly. Please tell me more about Pyroil and how it can accomplish this for me. Name Address City or Town State I- "Mickey can hang I his heels." THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 73 (Continued from Page 71) and those who have proved incorrigible in failing to turn in their manuscripts on time. Most contributors, with or without the use of the editorial needle, manage to get their pieces in before the dead line. If they don't, the Britannica has a "dilatory-domicile" technique of handling delayed copy. When the famous and much-pirated ninth edition was in the works, more than a half century ago, the editor asked Lord Rayleigh, the discoverer of argon, Nobel-prize winner and outstanding physicist of his day, to write the article on Light. When Volume 14, in which the Light article should have appeared, was ready to go to press, Rayleigh hadn't written the piece, asked for more time and suggested that it could be printed under the title Optics in the 0 volume. When that volume was reached, the distinguished scientist still hadn't finished the article, and asked that it be postponed to the U volume and titled Undulatory Theory of Light. The bedeviled editors acquiesced, but were not surprised when Rayleigh again disappointed them. He finally staggered under the wire in the W volume, with the article titled Wave Theory of Light. The same technique is occasionally used today under the spur of necessity. Shaping History The influence of a great encyclopedia is like the waves from a pebble dropped in still water. You cannot tell where it will spread. A century or more ago, a man named Timothy Dewey lived in East Hartford, Connecticut. Mr. Dewey was both a prolific man and an admirer of great people and great things. He named his eleven children George Roberts, Anna Diadama, Philander Seabury, Franklin Jefferson, Armenius Philadelphus, Almira Melpomene, Marcus Bonaparte, Pleiades Arastarcus, Victor Millenius, Octavia Ammonia and Encyclopedia Britannica. Little Er1cyclopeedia lived with her name for more than eighty years, but it must have frightened suitors away, for she was never married. Adm. Richard E. Byrd took the Britannica with him when he left all the rest of his party in Little America and spent the winter alone in Antarctica. Subsequently he wrote of the comfort it had given him in his solitude. Michael Faraday first became interested in chemistry, a field in which he was to become pre-eminent, when, as a bookbinder's apprentice, he took home with him and read at night volumes of the Britannica which had come in for rebinding. Innumerable authors, famous and obscure, write unsolicited letters to tell how the Britannica helps shape their work. Milton Caniff, pen-and-ink father of Terry and the Pirates, consults the Britannica before sending Terry on a new adventure abroad. The framers of the Irish Free State's constitution worked with the Encyclopedia constantly within reach. George Washington purchased a set after failing to win one in a lottery, and Alexander Hamilton also owned and relied on the Britannica. The editors never cease to be amazed by the innumerable uses to which their book is put. Sir Wilfred Grenfell, the noted medical missionary to Labrador, wrote to the editor to tell of an incident in the far north. Sir Wilfred wanted to build a hospital, but in winter the ground was frozen too hard for digging, and as soon as spring came every male inhabitant left home for the fishing. Some sticks of frozen dynamite were found and it was decided to blast the ground. The question was how to thaw the dynamite. One incautious soul tried to heat a stick of the dynamite on a stove, and a few minutes later took his departure for a better world. Someone thought of the Britannica. Would it tell how to thaw dynamite? It did. The hospital was built. A department head at Macy's heard a customer ask a new salesgirl what made silk rustle. To his amazement the young woman gave the correct explanation. She got a raise forthwith, and wrote to the Britannica to thank it for being responsible for the raise. "When I went to work," she wrote, "I read up on silk in the Encyclopedia." A couple, visiting friends for a week end, were asked by their host, on their arrival, if they played bridge. They told him they knew nothing about it. He suggested that, inasmuch as a bridge party was planned for the evening, they read the Britannica's article on bridge. They did and played that night. The husband became intensely interested in the game and went on to become an expert and widely read bridge writer. He was Shepard Barclay. Several years ago the Yusts found it necessary to install a new refrigerating unit, but were troubled about the type to get, for certain technical reasons. Yust returned home one day to be assured by Mrs. Yust that she had determined what kind of refrigerator they should have. "How did you settle it?" he asked. " I looked it up in the Encyclopedia," Mrs. Yust told him. "Gosh," said the Encyclopedia's editor, "I never thought of that." The refrigerator didn't work any too well, either, he says. But for Sears, Roebuck & Co., there would probably be no Encyclopedia Britannica today. The book got to Sears in a roundabout way. The first Americans to become interested in the Britannica were Horace Hooper, who had been with the Century Company, and his partner, Walter Jackson. They went to London in 1897 when they heard that The London Times had on hand thousands of remainder sets which it was unable to sell. Hooper, a dynamic salesman of the modern school, toolC over the books, advertised them in a way no Briton had ever seen books advertised— in newspapers, by letter, on the backs of sandwich men walking up and down the Strand. A New World to Conquer Hooper and Jackson eventually bought control of the Britannica and brought its plates to this country, where the eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth editions were published. After a period of ups and downs, the Encyclopedia was finally taken over in 1920 by Sears, Roebuck, largely because of Julius Rosenwald's interest in the project. But even the skilled merchandising of Sears failed, in the beginning, to establish the Britannica as a sound commercial venture. There were, as there had always been, periods of famine. During Hooper's high-pressure selling of the Encyclopedia in Great Britain and its Dominions, a number of the usual form sales letters were sent over a period of time to a farmer in the backwoods of Australia. The letters, each more urgent than the last, told him that a set of the Britannica was being reserved for him in Sydney and urged him to place his order immediately. Finally he received a telegram warning him that only two days remained for him to pick up his reserved Britannica in Sydney "at a ridiculously low cost." That got action from the bewildered Australian. Deciding he could afford to wait no longer, he hitched up his buggy and drove two nights and days without a rest, until he reached Sydney. Rushing breathlessly into the office, he demanded, "Where is my Britannica?" When the salesman pointed to a set standing in the corner, the farmer put his head in his hands, groaning with amazement and no little despair, " My God! Books!" Sears, Roebuck, saddled with the Britannica giant and seeming to get nowhere toward making it pay its own way, must have been sorely tempted to cry at times, " My God! Books! " Editors' Note—This is the first of two articles by Mr. Olivier. The second will appear next week. USE PYROIL for the longer miles that lie ahead... The miles that lie ahead are longer miles than the miles that lie behind: Your car isn't what it used to be—and it needs that bit of help from Pyroil —more than ever. Lubrication that adheres to cylinder walls and piston rings would reduce wear. Pyroil does it! A clean motor—free from sludges, carbon formations and gums would help. Pyroil does it! Better ask your gas station attendant to add life to your car. Simply say Pyroil! Manufactured and Guaranteed by Pyroil Company, W. V. Kidder, Founder, 971 Main Street, LaCrosse, Wisconsin.


1945_07_21--009-160 Miles of Words
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