Page 12

Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-12_Miles_48_Stops-by_Robert_Steven_Williams.docx

American to be tenured at this expensive private school. His parents still lived in Nelsonville, which was now mostly populated by well-to-do African Americans. Reverend Winston had turned down several offers from churches in prosperous black communities. He felt strongly about not abandoning places like Billington, where the gap between the haves and have-nots grew ever larger by the day, but it wasn’t just a need to help those less fortunate. He drew inspiration from women like Granny Jack who kept their spirits high in the face of adversity when they had few reasons to do so. He saw them as heroes, and he needed such people in his life because he often felt he’d had it too easy growing up, even though the white kids in Nelsonville were tough on the six black students in the school. Granny Jack had made an impression the first time they met, on the evening of her daughter-in-law’s shooting. “What kind of God takes a mother away from children that don’t have a father?” She demanded angrily. “That child gave her kids everything when she had nothing. What kind of God allows that? You tell me, reverend, what kind?” “From pain comes goodness,” he said. “We walk by faith, not sight.” “That child walked with blisters,” Granny Jack snapped, “and if we don’t do something soon, her kids gonna be hobbled


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-12_Miles_48_Stops-by_Robert_Steven_Williams.docx
To see the actual publication please follow the link above