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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-12_Miles_48_Stops-by_Robert_Steven_Williams.docx

father,” Renee said after Davida confessed her worries about Willie’s impending release. “He alive, honey. There’s still a chance he’ll make good.” “Slim to none.” “All I know, girl, if you and Bobby Ray go, the man got no chance at all.” Hours later, on the bus home, Davida drowsed to the drone of the engine. At one stop she watched through half-open eyes as a woman in a fast-food apron boarded, carrying a small girl in one arm like a sack of groceries. The girl held a stuffed lion. Davida hadn’t thought of Kimba in years. He’d gone everywhere with her, even after he got old and tattered. Granny Jack had offered to buy a new one, but she only wanted oneeyed, hairless Kimba. She exchanged smiles with the mother, wondering if she’d taken her child to work because she didn’t have a sitter. Would that little girl make school in the morning? When Davida got home just after midnight, Granny Jack was on the sofa watching TV, another bowl of caramel popcorn in her lap. Davida hung her coat in the hallway closet and caught a glimpse of the boxes on the top shelf, filled with childhood whatnots. She reached up for the box that held Kimba. ■


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-12_Miles_48_Stops-by_Robert_Steven_Williams.docx
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