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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-The_Answer_Box-by_C_Morgan_Hunt.docx

Rachel was certain he’d been a halibut in his previous life. “Thank you for coming, Mrs. Kersey.” “Rachel; Rachel Tighe. I’m divorced now.” “Of course.” He tried unsuccessfully not to stare at her residual bruises. “I wanted to talk to you about your son. Very bright boy, that Harry. Yes, indeed.” Rachel waited. “Some of his teachers have expressed concern that he’s not fitting in to the school’s social structure. That can be difficult …” “I’ll bet Einstein wasn’t captain of his football team.” Rachel’s stomach rumbled. She was on her lunch hour. Thanks to this appointment, she’d have no time to eat. She tapped her Salem into the ashtray on Rendell’s desk and daydreamed that his dark eyebrows had knit themselves together. “Is Harry’s schoolwork suffering?” “No; he continues to score in the top 1 percent of his class. But school isn’t only about book learning, as I’m sure you know.” Again she waited. Rendell shifted his bulk to the other side of his chair. “Harry’s teachers say that he’s obsessed with something called an Answer Box. It’s all he talks about. We recommend you remove this toy from the household to help Harry break


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-The_Answer_Box-by_C_Morgan_Hunt.docx
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