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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-The_Answer_Box-by_C_Morgan_Hunt.docx

this obsession. We believe it’s harming him psychologically and …” “I appreciate your concern but …” She averted her eyes, glancing toward the precisely aligned files stacked in his In basket. “We’ve been going through a bumpy time in our household; I think the Answer Box helps him somehow.” Rendell lost patience. “I hate to put it so bluntly, but Harry needs to know what ‘normal’ is. Have him join the Boy Scouts and go camping. Or get him a job delivering newspapers. Did you know he showed up at his class Halloween party dressed as a protruding hand, for God’s sake? It doesn’t help that you’re, well, so ‘colorful’ yourself. Why don’t you get to know some of the other mothers? Help with the school’s rummage sale. Join the PTA; bake brownies for their fundraiser. Go to church. You see, the trouble with Harry is …” “One of Hitchcock’s best, don’t you think?” Rendell had no sense of humor (or perhaps no knowledge of cinema) and the joke fell flat. Rachel knew it would; nevertheless, she refused to take him seriously. Taking him seriously would vest his accusations with a kind of legitimacy. She crushed her cigarette and stood up to leave. “Hate to cut this short, Stan, but I have brownies to bake.” She could feel his eyes on her back so she gave the old halibut a show — a sway of her hips


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest-The_Answer_Box-by_C_Morgan_Hunt.docx
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