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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx

and Neil’s two children, trailed behind. Both boys had crew cuts, wore their shirts tucked in, and on the rare occasions when they wore jeans to sporting events or the annual school picnic, the jeans sported big creases down the center in the front and back. Kate tried to remember how she felt about Bonnie before she’d started to really dislike her, but she couldn’t recall a time when she ever felt kindly toward her, or even neutral. Had Bonnie been different when she was younger? How had she ever gotten the attention of a man like Neil? Then she remembered Adam and her own mistakes. Understanding why couples were together was futile. Michelle’s husband Hank was a beer-guzzling car mechanic, and they couldn’t be happier. “Kids, go help Mrs. Chase getting the ballots in the office.” Bonnie’s boys didn’t move. They were both staring at Liam, looking lost. Bonnie lifted an arm around each of her sons and said in a slow, deliberate voice, “Say hel-lo to Li-am.” The boys obeyed, whispering barely audible “Hi, Liams” in sync with one another. Liam responded by saying, “E-LO!” Loudly. “My boys both have such good hearts.” Bonnie pointed them toward the door. “There’s a little blind girl that goes to our church. They take her arm sometimes, help her on the stairs.” Both boys couldn’t stop staring at Liam until they were out


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx
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