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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx

some time to get the wheelchair into that position without hitting the legs of the table. Kate had something on her mind, and, like a jealous lover, her son’s care demanded her full attention. “Ee-dea-na-in,” Liam shouted above a motorcycle passing outside. Every day, Kate would read the news from Baghdad in the Los Angeles Times aloud at breakfast. It was their ritual. U.S. and Iraqi forces trap gunmen in Samarra. Sunnis. Shiites. Suicide bombers in Baghdad. When Kate first started reading to him about the war, she imagined social workers arriving at her doorstep to take her children away, then leaving with only her daughter. No one wanted to care for a child with cerebral palsy. “Why does he like the war so much?” Sterling frowned at her brother. “It’s too weird.” She tapped her fork against her plate, ting, ting, ting. “I don’t know, honey. Stop that.” Kate pointed at the fork. Though she couldn’t explain her son’s fascination with Iraq, she liked to believe he was drawn to it because it was a different war than the one he was fighting. Still, Kate was careful not to say anything that might make her daughter pity Liam. She was more playful with Liam when


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx
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