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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx

She smiled and mouthed, “Yes, thank you.” He shrugged to say it was nothing. Kate looked down at his shoes. She hadn’t been around many men who wore suits, ties, and those serious, dressy men’s shoes that looked like they weighed a lot. She imagined herself on top of Neil with his suit still on. Crossing her legs, she pulled her fingers through her hair. Caring for a child with special needs was so sobering; she was relieved to know that she was still functional. Kate looked at the faces around her. The fluorescent lights cast a green hue on everyone. Other than Neil, there was only one other man. In the 1940s, Kate thought, this would have meant they were overseas, at war. Now where were they? Again, she chided herself. Why does everything always have to be about the war with me? Sometimes her own activism exhausted her. The crowd was different from the one she was used to — the parents of children with special needs — the ones with that look she could spot from across the room: haunted eyes peering out from a paper-thin breezy exterior. The children were being escorted to an adjacent room to watch the movie. Before she left, Kate asked


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx
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