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Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx

government as Kate liked to say, and the state government, starting with Reagan, had depleted most California public school funding. Arts programs had been cancelled, the school nurse was only there on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and the best teachers had left. Private schools were expensive and didn’t take kids with special needs. Kate had thought about sending Sterling to a private school. But, more than anything, she wanted her kids to stay together. Become friends, maybe. Kate took a deep breath. Losing her temper with Sterling was a losing battle and, she felt, a bad omen for the evening. “The school’s not bad, just the PTA president.” At a light, Kate looked into the rearview mirror. The reflection of the red light was sitting on her son’s face. The school had been tolerable until Bonnie Dowd became the PTA president. Liam’s class, a collaborative inclusion class, where half the children are typical and half have special needs, was the only one of its kind in the school district. Bonnie had started a fear campaign that seemed to be effective. More parents of the typical children that were in Liam’s class were going to the principal, Mrs. Chase, complaining that their child was


Microsoft Word - 2014_Great_American_Fiction_Contest_Winner-The_War_at_Home-by_Linda_Davis.docx
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