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A_Communique

THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 41 A COXIWUNZQUIE (Continued from Page 15) Here are nine men—each distinguished in his own line. They are a clergyman, musician, financial executive, industrial executive, promoter, lawyer, writer, engineer, financier. Each of them is well fitted for his work—a success because he supplemented his strongest natural aptitudes with training. If you are a good judge of character you should be able to decide the business of each of these men from his portrait. This isn't play. You must be able to make just such keen, accurate judgments of men if you are to be successful in your dealings with them. Look at these portraits carefully. Write in the coupon your judgment. We will send you the correct list, and at the same time tell you how to make accurate judgments for yourself through the SCIENCE OF CHARACTER ANALYSIS This science is definite, verified knowledge about the correspondence between men's outward appearance and their talents, disposition, training, habits and character—in short how to know what a man is from his looks. This knowledge is based upon the discoveries of the world's foremost anthropologists, biologists, anatomists, physiologists and psychologists. It has been mercilessly tested by repeated use in actual business and has successfully met every requirement. Big business men have paid big money for it because they saw big results. Many of my pupils are now earning good salaries using it in the selection of men and women employees for big corporations. Among the enthusiastic students of this Dr. Katherine M. H. Blackford is unusually qualified to formulate and teach this new science, because she had the unique combination of thorough scientific knowledge, medical practice, business experience, was a large employer of help, and a successful teacher. Her knowledge of medicine and related sciences gave her the foundation. Her practice in analyzing thousands of men, women and children of many races taught her to know how each outward indication of man's body corresponds with the inner forms of his soul. In the employing of thousands of men for big industrial establishments, she proved the commercial value of her ideas. She has consulted with great European criminologists and psychologists. She has taught thousands how to apply her principles in business and other activities. Now. with the whole organization of the Review of Reviews Co. to assist her, she is ready to give you her accumulated knowledge and experience—her personal teaching. (Signed) Review of Reviews Co. FREE Difference Between Blonds and Brunettes, To each who sends this.coupon we will give free a fasci- AZ r. nating scientific analysis showing mental and phys- ," Rath- ical characteristics of blonds and brunettes. At 4,4 erizet. the same time we will send the correct list and full information. cr ,..--S- e / ford, Review of Reviews Co., „ 4, .1 30 IrringPi..N.Y. Remember the knowledge contained ifr.,,) %.: dhaes.eIt bt:fiotiLwthme smen these these lessons has never been published .,,‘' I pictured on this nage before in any form. You cannot get it in other way than by sending this cou- 44.• / f""". non for fuller information. Send the b. " Clergyman_—_ Fin out the coupon, if you pre- ,.6,0/3,1(:.nnIicit'ila=rccUl Executive coupon todayend learn all about it. (Cr. send only your name and ,..,..> . Industrial Executive address for the full story. ....;‘,.;./ Lawyer Engineer KatherineM.H.Blackford,M.D. Writer__ . Review of Reviews Co, C..., ,,, n Put the number you think belongs with ,'' ,ach of these professions on these blank lines. 30 Irving Place ,,., Or, if you prefer not to try this test, just send New York 0 Your name and address for full information about 4/ t he course in Character Analysis.) Also, FREE, the Ie BrAwlnetsa3. and Physical Characteristics of Blonde and immailmippe Nline / Address loi course today are prominent bankers, large employers of skilled and professional help, the owner of one of the greatest newspapers in the world, the Governor of one of the States, a great advertising manager, presidents and managers of corporations, lawyers, doctors, clergymen, and other men and women who carry heavy responsibilities. Soon the man or woman who does not use this science will be as hopelessly outclassed as a physician without knowledge of bacteriology. You know that success in any line depends upon your ability to deal with men and that you must know them— not guess—be your guesses ever so clever. The day of guesswork in business is past. 21 Practical Lessons Taught By Mail These lessons were prepared for the busy man. You can carry them in your pocket and use up odd minutes with them. The street car, railway station, your own officeeven your own home- furnish you with clinical material for constant observation. There is no padding. no theory, but a clean-cut presentation of the principles underlying human character, with hundreds of photographs. diagrams, charts, etc. And you can see that this study is not work-but real pleasure as exciting as a detective story. You can learn this science and you can apply it with as much success as I can. I do not teach you to measure a man's head or to employ any other method than that of looking at him. You do not ask him questions or in any way make known that you are gaining information about him. There is no dictatorial laying down of rules, telling you that a wrinkled brow means concentration. full lips sensuousness, etc. You are taught principks and their application in such a way that you will not forget them. I can teach you to judge your jury, your congregation, your employer, your employee, your guests, the people you meet casually, your children, yourself, and the man who as your partner may make a success or a failure of your business venture. _ SEP 1-23 it 11 1 One of the last things I saw in France wasa dozen Red Cross orderlies and nurses having their breakfast in a comfortable hotel. Just inside the door of this room three children stood regarding them with hungry eyes. They were in rags. Their faces were emaciated and they were trembling with cold. They were orphans. Their father had been killed in Alsace-Lorraine. They were not begging; they had not learned how yet. They were just learning how to be hungry. and patient. Besides the " cannon fodder" which war makes of men it makes gutter straw of innocent children. When you read the White Papers of England and France, when you see troops going by, hear martial music, listen to patriotic speeches, you think this war is justified. You are proud of Anglo-Saxon courage and of French courage. You are glad to be living in an age that proves the mettle of men stronger than steel. But when you see the suffering of women, their defeats which are never published, when you compute their losses which nothing will ever compensate, when you look into the confiding eyes of fatherless children and know that these little ones must pay the enormous debts contracted by their nations in this struggle, you know that nothing does or can justify war. The question which the women of the future must decide is how far they are justified to their children and to themselves in practicing their devastating fidelity. I do not think they will ever be equal to the decision, for they are really devoted to men more than they are to their children or to themselves. The present situation affords abundant proof of that. They are serving war offices in a domestic capacity, to the injury of every other duty and without hope of reward. Strange fanaticism ! Pathetic evidence that they are made to obey, not to think of or to save themselves. They are the vestals of love to whom Nature seems to deny strength of mind or will to determine their own fate. After Paris, with her serious crowds and limping soldiers, her continual procession of military funerals, her shop windows filled with mourning garments, her fashionable cafés changed into public soup kitchens, her populous churches and closed theaters, London looks like a city in another world, rich, comfortable and prosperous—darker than ever at night, but with a darkness which no longer appals the imagination of the people. A Silly Woman's Protest While much was going on.in England in the name of charity Parliament was having the mischief of a time trying to make up its mind whether or not the guardians of the Poor Law children should deprive them of "an egg for breakfast on Christmas morning— as an object lesson on the horrors of war!" You understand that the Poor Law children are responsible for the horrors of this war and should be made to feel it! Naturally they will. They will be paying the war debt of England when the ashes of Churchill and Kitchener are reposing sublimely in St. Paul's or in Westminster Abbey. A very disagreeable thing has happened at the Front. A regiment of London Scottish after being under fire seven days and nights charged the enemy and routed him with such signal courage that the London papers made the mistake of praising them almost with American headlines. Of the thousand men in this regiment only two hundred and eighty survived. Now these same papers are ffiled with protests from people who want to know why the London Scottish should have so many laurels inked on their brows. The Scottish reply by calling attention to the fact that every town and village of Scotland has furnished volunteers for this war, and they want to know why they should not get credit for courage in action. The fashionable folk are suffering some from the vulgar aspect of things incident to the war. It seems that the men are not so particular about putting on their evening clothes when they dine. Lady Somebody has entered a solemn protest in the Agony Column of the Times calling attention to this. She adds, referring to a certain fashionable café, that it "looks like an American restaurant at the dinner hour because the men are so awfully dressed!" And I must say that it does give one a start to see at the next table an officer of a Highland regiment, clad in a khaki coat and terrifyingly short kilts, with his legs bare very far up and very far down. But, when you put your whole reasonable mind upon it, why should not a man show his mighty legs in a room filled with women who are exposing their shoulders behind down nearly to the waistline? Besides, that Highlander looks more the part of what a man should be here now than the perfumed English Lord Dandy at the next table, with his receding chin, his womanish hands, and his pink face that has never been exposed to the disgusting grime of powder smoke. A woman must hate war; but my idea is that if a nation makes up its mind to fight it should have conscription for the gentlemen dandies, and it should hold in reserve these better, bare-legged, long-chinned men for the sake of preserving the breed in the next generation. Boring the High.Brows All the theaters are open. An effort is being made to arouse the people by putting on patriotic plays. They are the most advertised and the least popular. The Dynasts, an epic drama by Thomas Hardy, has been abridged and produced by Granville Barker at Kingsway Theater. It is an attempt to dramatize ten years of the Napoleonic wars, beginning with the death of Nelson at Trafalgar and ending with the Battle of Waterloo. But there is no scenery and no battles. Mr. Barker, seated below the awful gray stage, reads most of the lines. And he is assisted by two terrible-looking sibyls seated on each side in front of the stage who chant after the manner of the Greek chorus. The effect is dull but none the less impressive. Kingsway Theater is the playhouse for "cultured people," but Mr. Barker has given them more than they bargained for this time. On the second night, after every daily in London had published extravagant notices of The Dynasts, the house was not more than half filled. The one ray of light in the gloomy scene was not on the stage, where Nelson and one great general after another were dying with frightfully realistic contortions, but it was in the box directly above, where Mr. Bernard Shaw leaned over and watched the performance with devilish composure. Parliament had just noticed Mr. Shaw by saying it would take no notice of his offensive pamphlet, Common Sense and the War. The most apparent change in England during the past month is in the cordial spirit of the Press to the French Army. In September and October one might have supposed that the British were the only troops fighting in France. The papers were filled with their exploits to the exclusion of the French, who outnumber them eight to one. Now every morning we have a long list of deeds of valor translated from the French. The critics of England—who are never Frenchmen !— claim that this enlightenment of the English Press came when the Germans took Antwerp and Ostend. These English people are so conscious of their own valor that it has taken three months of terrific fighting on the part of the French Army to draw their attention. Now that they do see we may be sure that they will make it a point of honor to recognize the brilliant achievements of the French troops. The English people are naturally insufferable where it is a question of manners, of nice courtesies to other people. But when it comes to what they recognize as justice and honor, they are not to be surpassed by any other people in this world. The government is still appealing for recruits. The apathy of certain classes may be due to the firm conviction entertained by the common man that "war is a gentleman's trade." There is something in this. It is a gentleman's trade, where, as in other trades, the common man who is not a gentleman does the work. The artisans and valets and flunkeys and roustabouts may even be deficient in the military branch of patriotism. Certainly the common working man is saying less than anyone else in England. But he is probably doing more thinking of his own than he ever has done before. Who started this racket anyhow? Not he. Who will be benefited by it? Not he. Who will suffer


A_Communique
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