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A_Communique

42 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST January 25, 1915 "They've got you good—anyway" "Mr. Griggs, the New York office has called my attention to a poor policy "I've been expecting something of the sort ever since I refused to let them of your department." replace their oak furniture with mahogany. What is it?" "They've got you good—anyway. Here are seventeen office forms and no two are on the same quality of paper. Now that seems to indicate a lack of system in buying." "Possibly. It's because we give out this work on competitive bids and a form is rarely printed by the same printer twice." "I know; but wouldn't it protect us to pick out a standard paper that we know will always be the same in quality, color and finish and which is watermarked so you can tell what you are getting—and then stick to it ?" "That's the only safe 3C YND way of course—the trouble is to find a paper we can "The Utility Business Paper" rely on absolutely." Envelopes to match Just so—and without meaning to interfere, I have taken the liberty of sending for a portfolio of samples of a paper which seems admirably suited for our forms, form letters, price lists, etc. It is strong, attractive in looks and has a quality feel and rattle and the price is moderate. It is Hammermill Bond ; here is the Portfolio." Send for a big Portfolici showing samples in three finishes and in 12 colors and white. HAMMERMILL PAPER CO., Erie, Pa. In vestigate Ilarnmerrnill Sa fetyPaper used by the United States Government 51-commummainimainoniniamonsoniumenliiiiimmillimonsonimmuilmoinonommilimmimmona 130-Egg Incubator and Brooder Freight Paid Both for !t Rockies Hot water double walls: copper tank—best constr..- tion. Write for tree Catalog. Wisconsin Incubator Co. Box 142 Money Making Poultry Our specialty. Leading varieties pure-bred chickens, turkeys, ducks and geese. Prize winners. Best stock and eggs. Lowest prices; oldest farm. Fine 30th Anniversary catalog FREE. H. M. JONES CO. Box 98, Des Moines, lows — 1 A Fortune to the Inventor who reads and herds it is the possible worth of the book we send for 6 cents postage. Write us at once. R. S. A A. B. LACET, Dept. A, WASHINGTON, D. C. FLORIDA SUBURBAN HOME with 30 acres of good land, 20 in orange and grapefruit trees, with 15 acres bearing. One half mile from the Gulf, ten minutes' walk from business center of the growing town of Dunedin, on the Tampa rock road. Price $20,000, terms. B. C. BAss, Dunedin, Florida. FOY'S BIG BOOK FREE POULTRY AND SQUABS FOR PROFIT. An encyclopedia of poultry information. Written by a man who knows. Leading varieties of poultry and pigeons In natural colors. Low prices on fowls,eggs and incubators. Frank Foy Poultry Farm, Box 6, Clinton, Iowa 3 Belle City Now 21 Times World's Champion Incubator Get the story. My new free book, money-making "Hatching Facts," Ills everything. Book also et,. y $800 Gold °Renaud my money- ' back guaranty. My low price will surprise you. Jim Pollan. Pres. Bells Casinos. Co., Box 77, Racine,Wis. 2 1 Hundreds BOOK 1 o of Success Secrets—Tells all „broode.....,practillagga FREE ever offered FREE. A postal gets It—WRITE TODAY. Prairie State Incubator Co., 1111 Yalu Street, Homer City. Pa. — Ford Cars Run 31 Miles per Gallon with the aid of the Whittlesey-FordCarburetor Adjuster-$1Prepaid guatantre,1 iminey Lear without umbb:, . Whittlesey Company, Dept. 7, 11 Broadway, New York Hotel Guides giving names, rates and plan of best hotel. in U. S., mailed FREE OF COST. Also tell how travelers may have checks cashed at hotels. AGENTS WANTED. HOTEL CRELIr LETTER, Post 505 Fifth Ave., N. Y. Sixty-fiveyears'experience. Send sketch and short description: of your invention. All patents secured by us receive free notice in the Scientific American. Hand book free. Washington Office, Washington, D. C. MUNN & CO., 365 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY r most from it? He will. Therefore he will at least save his life. The fearlessness with which Paris accepted the German Taubes has done much to deliver London from anxiety. These people are actually becoming impatient, like an audience in a darkened house waiting for the curtain to rise and for something to happen. "We are tired of waiting for those Zeppelins," a woman said to me. "It is ridiculous having to stay here in the dark for months like rats in a hole. And they never come. Some of us prefer to be delivered from suspense even if it is with a bomb!" Such is the aspect and the spirit of this place and this people at the present moment. One might suppose that the Germans were a thousand miles distant, that no men are fighting and dying in Flanders, that no women and children are suffering for food and clothes. The attitude of the government to these latter victims may be inferred from a recent discussion in Parliament. Mr. Barnes asked for an increase in the pensions for soldiers' widows, urging that they should be kept out of the labor market. Mr. Asquith was sympathetic in his reply. He was willing that the officers' widows should be kept out of the labor market, but he thought there were objections to making a common soldier's widow independent. "We all have work to do, or at least we ought all to work in our different spheres and different 'degrees," was the way he put it. What he meant was that all the working classes ought to work for their living. Still, if anyone has earned the right of choice in her mode of living as is conferred by a pension that will maintain her, it is surely the woman who has made the greatest sacrifice that the state can ask, whether she is the widow of an officer or of a private! Complications must arise, by the way, from the enlisting of so many gentlemen as privates. Their widows will receive only the pension of the widow whose husband belonged to the "working class" ! Meanwhile there is the other aspect of this situation. The Women's Army of Defense in England is growing every day in numbers and in efficiency. The time is not distant when they will far outnumber, if they do not already, those finicky idle women who cannot bear to see a man eat his dinner in a sack coat. English Guns That Speak German "What is the most hopeful evidence of progress you have made during the last month?" I asked an officer of the Women's Emergency Corps. "Well, we are doing more work because we are learning how to work," she replied. "When you were here before we boasted of being able to feed three hundred refugees for a week. Last week we fed eighteen hundred. And we are teaching over a thousand recruits French and German." " German !" I interrupted. "Of course we must take Berlin. When they invade that country they will need to know German," she explained calmly, as if it were a foregone conclusion that the Allies will march on Berlin. "But we find it so difficult to teach them. They do not want to learn. They say they know a better way to speak German—gungutturals!" she added, laughing. She led the way into the exhibition room of the toy workers. "This industry, you see, is flourishing. A hundred girls in our shop here, another shop in the suburbs of London, and twenty more branches in different parts of England." It would be too tedious to enumerate the different toys on exhibition in that very large room literally filled with samples. But they were all original, designed by the workers. The children of Great Britain had a delightful surprise in store for them this Christmas. For they received literally new playthings which have never before been seen, even by Santa Claus. Few capitalists with all the experience of commercialism could have established in the short space of three months a business with twenty-one branches even in prosperous times. But these women have done that. They have paid the workers regular Labor Exchange wages and they have cleared all other expenses. The making of toys is a great and lucrative industry. These women are in a fair way to get the greater part of it. As we left the shop the officer referred again to my first question. "But I do not think the success of this work, or the feeding of so many refugees, or the finding of positions for so many other women, is after all the most hopeful sign of progress we have made," she said thoughtfully. "What is, then?" I asked. "The decline of parochial cattiness in England!" she replied. "What on earth is parochial cattiness?" I exclaimed. "Social service with us has been limited. Each woman or clique of women did what they did in their own parish or small community. No system, no cooperation. Often there were jealousies, antagonisms, methods which pauperize and only add to the general distress. Now we are getting beyond that. We are working together intelligently, from one end of this kingdom to the other, as one woman for all women. We are overcoming the very real iniquities of charity. We are trying to provide employment, create opportunities for women, develop their capacities and their energies, and above all their self-respect." That is the plan upon which they are actually working, not writing or lecturing. But "It's a long, long way to Tipperary!" If they are very successful generation after generation they may realize it in a couple of hundred years. But here and now the women and children are suffering as much from the Allied Armies as they are from the Germans. They are being "licked," with no possible means of defense. In the Midst of Life And that is not all. The bravest, strongest, best men of England, France and Germany are being "licked" too. For when a man dies in battle he is defeated. If he returns home maimed he is worse than defeated. The loss is not only to the army; he is a far greater loss to his country in the future. And does anyone doubt that it is the best men these nations are losing? The others are holding back, at least this is the case in England. They are not furnishing their proportion of the "cannon fodder." At the headquarters of the French Army in Boulogne I saw more than a hundred officers of both armies. And I have never seen anywhere more splendid-looking men. Lean old generals, broad-shouldered colonels, all wearing the very countenance of victory. One would have said that nothing could defeat such men. Yet I shuddered as I watched them. Every single man in that room was facing death as if it were a crown he coveted. Once the door was flung open. A man covered with snow and mud hurried in. He was a messenger with news from the Front. Instantly there was a stir. A tall young British officer, with a face as keen as a sword, seized his great coat, saluted and went out. The next day the eleven o'clock boat upon which I came to Folkestone carried his body back to England. That is what happens every hour of every day and every night. And it happens like that. This moment he is a man filled with all hopes and all courage, more significant and more mysterious than the stars above his head. The next moment he is less than the dust he trod. The part that was hope, courage and mystery is gone. What remains is so horrible that even love makes haste to hide it in the earth. War seems to me the most hideous delusion of which men are capable. And it is a delusion peculiar to them. If all the people were women there could never be such a thing as war. We are not cowards, but we shed our blood to bring life, not death. 64, Freight Preptid 1,2 or 3mos. Homo Test PATENTS Welsh Rarebit: Pour cup of ale or beer into small saucepan, add one tablespoon LEA & PERRINS' Sauce and saltspoon red pepper, bring to boiling point, add I of finely chopped American cheese and stir until thoroughly melted. Pour over freshly prepared slices of toast and serve at once. UPON REQUEST WE WILL MAIL, FREE OF CHARGE, a most useful kitchen hanger of suggestions for espeiallydelightf ul breakf as t , I u ncheon and dinner disheswith recipe for each showing exact quantity to make per person. LEA & PERRINS. 239 West Street, New York


A_Communique
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