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30 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST February 13, 1915 This Story Told A Billion Times Here is a story we have told a billion times in publications like this. Again and again we have told it to nearly every housewife in the land. Millions who read it ordered these delights. Their folks, morning, noon and night, revel in Puffed Wheat and Rice. But other millions miss them. For their sake we repeat the story over and over here. The Premier Food Delights Puffed Grains stand pre-eminent among cereal food delights. They are the best-cooked grain foods in existence. They are the only foods in which every granule is blasted by steam explosion. They are Prof. Anderson's scientific foods, endorsed by all author- ities. Every atom feeds. Digestion is easy and complete. The one regret is that all grain foods can't be treated likewise. They are bubbles of grain, airy, flaky, porous. They are thin and crisp and fragile. The wheat and rice kernels are, by steam explosion, puffed to eight times normal size. And terrific heat has given the morsels a taste like toasted nuts. Nothing more unique and inviting ever came to a morning table. Imagine these bubble-like dainties, with a myriad toasted walls. Do you serve anything else so fascinating as these tit-bits puffed f rom grain ? Puffed Wheat, 12c Puffed Rice, 15c Except in Extreme West CORN PUFFS /50 Serve as breakfast cereals. At noon or night-time float in bowls of milk. Use like nuts in candy making. Let hungry children eat them dry, like peanuts, or doused with melted butter. Find out how folks like them, and which grain they like best. Each has a different flavor. These are table joys which every home should have. And as foods which do not tax the stomach these stand unique. • There are all these reasons for getting Puffed Grains. Do you know a single reason for not ? Order now the one you haven't had. The Quaker Oats Company Sole Makers Up to the hour of mobilization that constituted the salve with which it soothed its conscience. The Czar was discontented and complained to his ministers. They replied: "We are in the business now and we cannot get out. We are a rich nation. Never do we fail to redeem our paper. If we give up the sale of vodka we are lost." The Czar answered, and his reply has been quoted: "If the nation can be rich only by the poverty of my people then I should prefer that the nation should be poor." He had not given up—the Czar never gives up; but his moment might have been a long while in coming, except for Emperor William. These two monarchs, between them, have executed a coup that might almost seem to constitute some compensation for the war. At any rate, it is the nearest approach to one that has yet glimmered through the nightlike gloom of battle. If men die that others may live sanely then they do not die for nothing. If the slaughter of millions in this century shall result in living conditions that will save millions in the centuries to come; if the death of living, breathing men is the only thing that can bring about legislation for the salvation of men who shall one day live and breathe; if the finite mind is so limited that only catastrophe can knock it into right thinking—then perhaps war is necessary. The temperance wave swept into France also, and the sale of absinth has been prohibited since the first days of the mobilization. England is restricting the sale of drink, and it is said that the darkening of the streets at night is partly with the idea of discouraging intoxication. Russia, entirely sober for the first time in her national existence, stands up bright and buoyant, with a new hope and a new joy. She has no regrets and no problems. Even the Minister of Finance, His Excellency Mr. Bark, says she has not, as he stands smiling with optimism in the capital of his emancipated country and faces the situation of raising—to replace the revenue from vodka—the modest sum of a thousand million rubles a year. WHAT N 77 Dried Vegetables SLICED or cut vegetables dried by special processes, so that they will keep for long periods in various climates and also be economical to transport, are now being manufactured; and the United States Army is trying out quantities of them in the hope that they will solve the problem of furnishing good vegetables at reasonable rates to the troops at distant posts. The process is called dehydrating, meaning that the water in the vegetables is removed. Before cooking, the vegetables are soaked in water until they take up as much moisture as they had when fresh. The soldiers have not objected to dehydrated potatoes and onions, and soldiers in practical campaigning have always been found to be quick and keen critics of new food schemes. For one thing, these prepared vegetables look almost exactly like fresh vegetables after the cook has fixed them up, and the taste has not been found to be materially changed. Potatoes and onions are the favorite vegetables of commissary officers, and so the army tests have been on those; but dehydrated carrots, corn, beets, tomatoes and turnips are also available. Several processes, each either patented or secret, have been developed to extract the water from the vegetables without injuring the texture or framework of the sliced goods. Large amounts of water are taken from all the vegetables. One pound of dehydrated potatoes represents six and a half pounds of fresh potatoes, and an equal amount when prepared for cooking, and one pound of dehydrated onions represents twelve pounds of fresh onions. Consequently dehydrating is not only valuable by making it possible to keep the food but helps greatly in the transportation problem. Great quantities of canned vegetables were used in the Spanish War in spite of transportation troubles, and the new idea should be of immense value in another campaign. Attempts have been made to serve the troops with some form of dried vegetables, but in the past a desiccated form was tried. Desiccated vegetables are fresh vegetables dried and powdered, and perhaps partly cooked. Such vegetables keep and are easy to transport; but trouble comes in getting men to eat them. In the Philippines desiccated vegetables were served to the soldiers, but they would not eat the mush, because it did not look or taste like the real thing. The new system, which delivers the prepared foods sliced or cut in fairly large pieces, overcomes the objection. Getting to the Fire FIRE departments in several large cities have been equipped recently with outfits to enable the firemen to get through steel-barred windows and iron fire doors with a delay of only a few seconds. Locked fire doors, with no key available, or barred windows often prevent a fire company from getting at the critical part of a spreading fire. The cutting outfit is the now well-known oxyacetylene apparatus—streams of oxygen and acetylene from tanks being united to develop a very great heat, sufficient to melt steel as a knife cuts cheese. The whole outfit weighs slightly over one hundred pounds, so that firemen can carry it into a building for quick use. In practice firemen have cut through twenty heavy steel bars on a window in less than a minute, cut off the half-inch steel hinges of a fire door in twenty-four seconds, and cut completely round the lock of a heavy door in thirty-six Seconds. Hot Doors DOOR heaters, to heat by electricity any air that may creep into the house under the door, have appeared abroad. One looks like a length of iron pipe, which is attached to the lower edge of the door so that it will barely clear the floor. Common electric heating apparatus is inside the pipe, and sufficient heat is manufactured to take the sting from the draft under the door. Wires run from the heater, either by way of the door hinges or by a protected cable, to the nearest socket, from which electricity may be taken. An automatic switch cuts off the current whenever the door is opened and starts it again when the door is closed. The door heaters unfortunately consume a great deal of current. Falling East BECAUSE the earth whirls so fast, rocks dropped into the very deep shafts of Michigan copper mines disappear on the way down. At some of the shafts, which i are nearly a mile deep in a straight drop, it is the general belief that a load of broken stone can be dumped into the hole at the injury top without causing any njury to a man standing at the bottom. On account of the motion of the earth a rock will not fall perfectly straight, but will bear to the east, lodging in the timber lining or perhaps bounding from wall to wall until it is broken up or caught by some A group of experimenters from the projection. Michigan College of Mines has verified this by careful tests with steel balls. One ball was hung by a thread over the hole, about four feet from the east side, and the thread burned. A clay box had been placed at the bottom of the shaft to catch the ball, but it never appeared. Another ball was then dropped, by the same method, a little farther away from the east edge, and this ball, also, did not get to the bottom. Careful search located the first ball imbedded in the timbers eight hundred feet down, but the second ball never has been found. As earth revolves the surface is s moving eastward at a rate which varies with the latitude. Down in the earth the rate is not so fast, on the same principle that a point on the tire of a wheel revolves faster than one on a spoke. Consequently at the distance of a mile below the surface the speed rate iis less than at the surface. The falling ball, however, continues to move toward the east at the same velocity it had on the earth's surface.


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