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Bacon - Comrades in Arms

78 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST October 27, 1917 "Patrick" Personality The "indefinable something" so often admired in garments of extreme smartness is at last defined in "Patrick personality." The "patrick " adapts itself to your fancy and never fails to add the last touch of distinction. Ply fog WOOL PRODUCTS 4 644.41,..w...., are unique in texture, appearance and quality. Men and women of good taste recognize at once the appropriateness of Patrick cloth to the outdoor occasion. It is as distinctive as the cheviots to Scotland and tweeds to England. Of this cloth are "Patricks " (Mackinaws), Great Patricks (long coats), Caps, Auto Robes aannd Blankets. Of the Patrick wool are Macka-Knit andd socks. For sale at best stores. Write for the Patrick Book showing styles, patterns and colors. PATRICK-DULUTH WOOLEN MILL 208 Commerce Street Duluth, Minn. Style 5400 Men's Tailored Great Patrick, unlined,wide convertible shawl collar, doublebreasted, belt back, roomy slashed side pockets, length 48 inches. Sizes 36 to 46. Style 5401—Same as 5400, except full lined with Skinner's guaranteed satin. Style 5404—Same as 5400, except half lined with Skinner's guaranteed satin. Splendid Christmas Gifts Pocket Shoe Polisher for evtry body. A leather covered case, 3y, in. long by 2 wide, wi h Dauber, Polisher, and Polish— black or tan—with hand-color d Gift Card. Ste. Stamps or coin. 910.15925. Artistic SHin.Bowl Flower Holder, 3 White Narcis sus Baths, Bird Ornament, and Hand Colored Gift Card, $1.00 • alarming gift for anybody who loves flowers. Two months' growth, then the beautiful, (ea grant flowers. Pin adollar bill to this ad and send to The Holmes Co. Money back if you want it. Our Big Gift Book pictures thousandsof splendid gifts, something to please everybody and at right prices. Your list of names, and our Blg Gift Book Is ell you need. Send for the book Today—NOW. It's Free, and it's • great big help. THE HOLMES 00., 317101mwood.Provi den ce, R.I. ..,•••• n •Z A THOUSAND WAYS TO PLEASE A HUSBAND An ideal gift for a young housekeeper by Louise Bennett Weaver and Helen Cowles Le Cron Here's what happened—Bob and Bettina got married and the very first thing Bettina did when she got back from her wedding trip was to Jump into her big apron and set to work making a home for her Bob. 162 chapters showing how she triumphed over housebold tribulation and made a little heaven of her home. 979 pun of The Romance of Cookery—the ittsPirotioss of houselleefrieg—defixise—oeserate—economical Beautifully bound. Barre illustrated. AU Bookstore.. $1.50 net. By mail, extra 120. BRITTON PUBLISHING COMPANY, N. Y. AUTO FINISHES "But you've got a chance to help me. Good Lord, Grant, you take it too seriously. You haven't done anything to us. You just imagine it. But if you still think so, now is the time when we could get together and forget it. You'd be doing something for me —" "You—you'd go in with me—after all this?" said Gilstar with a twitching upper lip "Why, Mr. Raunce, I wouldn't dream 19 "It would be a great thing for me," sighed the older man. "I know my limitations. You've got—youth. That's the big asset." At the door leading into the dining room a figure suddenly appeared—a graceful girlish figure—and a flushed and eager face and let him. She didn't know that she liked it, you see; she thought she was just not hurting his feelings! " Why," she explained thoughtfully, "I suppose they have other things to do, don't you? Rich women, you know, don't expect to take care of babies." "Oh! Rich women ! Phew!" he burst out with a look of such disgust that she had to laugh again. "Some of them are quite nice, really," she hazarded. "Not for mine!" he cried abruptly, and then as Dagmar approached, panting, with the key, he lifted his cap and walked away suddenly, very stiff in the back, as one remembering his high position and responsibility. All that day the little encounter amused her in memory; she smiled, recalling his flushed, freckled embarrassment, his ingenious appeal to her mercy. "He's an awful nice p'liceman," said Barbara; "but he oughtened to have forgottened his key, ought he?" "He's just beginning p'licing prob'ly," suggested Marjory; and it occurred to Elizabeth that recruits must learn, somehow, somewhere, and that this was as good a place as any other to break them in. The next morning he was at the gate as they came up. " I've got it!" he cried boyishly, and held up a key. "The Cap. forgot to give it to me—what do you think of that?" "Are you learning how to 'Ace?" Marjory inquired with interest. certainly am," said he, strolling into the park. "You watch me police this park, now!" They sat on the bench and he stalked stiff and straight round it, to the delight of all the other children. As he drew up before them and saluted gravely, Barbara spoke: "You aren't a blue policeman," she announced; "why aren't you blue?" And Elizabeth realized suddenly that this was so; she had not noticed it. "Because we're sort of beginners," he explained good-naturedly; "we aren't fat enough for the blue uniforms, kiddie." "I s'pose they put you here because there's only children, mostly?" said Marjory. "That's the idea." "What's your name, p'liceman?" demanded Barbara. "My name's David," said he. "I hope you like it?" " Where were you before you came here? " Elizabeth asked. " What did you do?" She spoke as she would have spoken to an interesting, well-mannered young guide or courier abroad. She forgot that he could not be expected to understand across what a gulf her interest stretched; that to him her kind young voice was only the voice of a kind young woman in a nurse's uniform. " Oh, I was on the rural police upstate," he answered, flushing a little, "in Westchester County." " Oh yes," she said, remembering the lean, olive-trousered men she had so often motored past; "those men round the aqueduct?" "Yes," he said simply; and she noticed that he didn't say "yes ma'am" or even "yes, lady." She liked it in him; of course those boys upstate must be of a very different class from the ordinary city policeman. That was why his voice was so pleasant and his manner only shy, only a little awkward—not common or impertinent. She remembered, suddenly, that one that seemed to Grant, as he looked up, to have almost an aureole round it. "I couldn't help hearing what you said," began Christine Raunce. "I didn't mean to. But—don't you think you could be happy here, Grant? Father means just what he says. He has spoken about it—before." "Happy here!" murmured Grant, looking from the girl round the worn old office. "Here! With you folks! Why, this seems more like home—but it's too late now!" He looked into the girl's eyes. He felt that Tom Raunce's eyes were on him. Then Gilstar rose—and looked out the window. Tom Raunce stooped over, picked up the suitcase and put it behind the desk. "Fix up Room Seven for Grant, Chrissie !" he said. "He'll be here to-night anyway." of her father's uncles had been the sheriff of the little village where the Griswolds were born. And somehow this remembrance pleased her. The girl did not realize, you must believe, with what unconscious expectation her days were filled after this. She did not realize that she came a little earlier each morning; that he entered the park as a matter of course and strolled about with her; that he waited at the gate; that he found the one Open place at the north end and leaned, talking, against the iron spikes, while she sat, listening, on her bench, with Kenneth beside her. One day, when it rained hard all day, she wondered why she was so restless, why the children tried her so, why a little paining shadow darkened everything inside her. Then, when it cleared suddenly, at half past four, she wondered again at the quickness of her shaking fingers as she pulled on their rubbers, for she was in too much of a hurry to wait for Dagmar. "I can take them, Miss Griswold," said the nursemaid; but she answered sharply, "No, indeed! The air will do us all good. Hurry, Marjory!" As they entered the dripping park he swung over to them, slim flanked, with a long, young stride; why did Doctor Henderson's short, nervous step patter through her mind? A rubber poncho fell to his hips; he looked like some young officer on the stage. "Oh! I never thought you'd come!" he cried; and a strange, crowded sensation pushed up round her—her—why, was that her heart? Why was she breathing so hard? Why should they laugh so, suddenly? The sun poured out; the grass was emerald, diamond studded; the trees were full of birds. She glanced up at him, over the swinging rubber cape, and met his eyes full. They were blue eyes, and suddenly they turned into shining, piercing arrows that rained down, all fiery, into hers. It was blue and yet it was fire; it frightened her and yet it brought her peace; it threatened and yet it held. You know, of course, what it was, but Elizabeth did not. She knew, naturally, that people fell in love; she supposed they did it at a ball or in a gondola or while hearing beautiful music. Perhaps they looked up from some book of poems they were reading together. You see, she thought, poor child, that it was an idea—a something that attacked the mind. And of course it occurred between people of the same class. So when he swung along beside her and looked at her—and looked at her—and her knees began to shake and that great wave rose and swelled in her side, the girl thought she was ill, and dropped, panting, on her bench; which was very damp, but she never knew it. He sat near her and it seemed to her that the side of her body next him belonged to some other person than herself—he was so near—so near - They had not spoken. She glanced down at his hands; they were clenched on his knees. She wondered why. "I—I never knew anybody like you," he said, and his voice sounded husky and far away. A lifetime of self-restraint came to help her. "It—it cleared off, d-didn't it?" she murmured. He turned and seized her hands roughly; there was a wild, hot look in his eyes. "Listen," he said, "were you ever—fond of anybody—before?" (Continued on Page 81) alastalassimeassoseressesass Paint Your Ford for $1.00 Think of it—only one coat of Glidden Auto Finish and you have a new looking car. You can easily do it yourself and in less than 48 hours you'll be driving again. You'll have a rich, brilliant finish that will give you lasting satisfaction. Go to your regular dealer. If he cannot supply you, send $1.00 (Canadian Imperial Quart $1.25) for 1 quart of Auto Finish Black to—THE GLIDDEN VARNISH CO., 1503 Berea Rd., Cleveland, Ohio. Canadian Address, Toronto, Ontario. Note to Dealers—Send at once for our Marketing Book of Glidden Auto Finishes. COMRADES IN ARMS (Continued from Page 7)


Bacon - Comrades in Arms
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