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Bacon - Comrades in Arms

82 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST October 27,1917 If you want a clear, healthy skin, you must do your part. Select the right kind of soap. Remember, no one soap can possibly answer every purpose; some skin affections require the mild stimulation of tar soap—others the beneficial treatment of sulphur soap, and so on. By making the name Johnson & Johnson your guide, you can get the kind of soap you need— no matter what the condition of your skin. Made in the same laboratories that produce the world - famous Johnson & Johnson Surgical Dressings, these soaps give you the benefit of years of research. Physicians recognize that Johnson & Johnson Medicated Soaps provide the proper nutrition for the skin, making i t heal th y,smooth and clean. Ask your druggist about his full assortment of Johnson & Johnson Medicated Soaps. Your druggist is always ready to serve your interests, and to faithfully carry out the instructions of your physician.Your druggist deserves your confidence. felt it myself. But what could I do? You wouldn't let me talk to her. I wonder what she'll say?" "Say? Ben Griswold, what do you mean?" For his eyes were strange, his voice was shaky and sounded like the voice of the young man who had asked her to marry him twenty-seven years ago, when she was twenty-four. " I mean when she sees this," and he stuck his hand into his waistcoat and dropped a flash of white light into her lap. It was of glass apparently, but blinding, and about the size of a five-cent piece. "He seems very fond of her, Betsy. He says she's the only girl he ever looked at; and, by George, I nearly believed him!" "But, Ben f 1 "You never even asked his name, my dear." "But how —" "His name is Craigie—David Craigie." "N—not — Ben, it's not the David Craigie?" " I'm afraid it is, my dear. I wish he didn't have quite so much, Bessie. It's a pretty heavy responsibility, you know." She stared at him, stupid in the great revulsion. "He said he got sick of signing checks all the time, and not doing anything; he's a shy sort of chap, Bessie. He equipped an entire volunteer company up at that big place of theirs on the Hudson, you know, and still he couldn't feel like anything useful, he said, so he went into the rural police volunteers up there and then joined the reserves here. He's very quiet, you know— nobody knows him much. "He told me he hated the sight of a girl till he saw Beth. Suspected 'em all, I suppose. Sort of a serious chap—just the sort for her, I should say. Nothing very showy, but all there." "But, Ben—that old Mr. Craigie has— how much money has he, Ben?" "A good deal more than anybody ought to have, my dear," said her husband soberly; "somewhere round forty or fifty million, I've heard. We didn't discuss it. He told me—young Craigie did—that Beth had found out somewhere how much a roundsman got a year, and explained to him how they would manage to live on it—twelve hundred, I think it was. He was thinking all the time that she thought it would be a rise in the world ! " And now,' he says to me, 'now I know what she was really thinking—my God, I love her more than ever, Mr. Griswold !' " Mrs. Griswold was not listening, one fears. She was staring at the ridiculous shiny ring of white fire in her hand. Later, she cried a little and kissed her husband in the motor and he patted her shoulder. The last twenty-four hours had been hard for her, as you will understand. So Elizabeth was married, in white satin, very plain indeed—to draw the eye to the great rope of pearls, her bridal gift from her husband. The biggest was about the size of a big white grape, and they ran down from that through moth balls to the little ones at the clasp, which were the size of peas. She looked very lovely and distinguished, and not at all tired; perhaps because she had refused to bother about anything, before the wedding, and passed most of her time in Gramercy Park. Marjory and Barbara were flower girls, and Kenneth sat in a front pew and talked with imaginary birds all through the service. It is difficult to point a moral against foolish mothers from this story, for though Mrs. Griswold was undoubtedly foolish to have brought up her daughter to marry a multimillionaire, yet, you see, she did marry a multimillionaire. Which was, nevertheless, no credit to Mrs. Griswold, inasmuch as Elizabeth supposed herself to be about to marry a policeman ! After the wedding the reporters all rushed off to Mr. Craigie's special car, which lay conspicuously in the Grand Central Station, en route for his Adirondack camp. A tall man and a lady in a thick veil climbed hastily into this car, and nobody dreamed that they were Mr. Craigie's man and Mrs. Craigie's maid. And so, naturallyenough, nobodydreamed of following the young couple to a modest but comfortable apartment overlooking Gramercy Park, which had been cleaned and polished to a state of supremacy by Dagmar, and vacated just before the wedding by the wondering Barbara and Marjory. Kenneth never wondered at anything. They sat on a little balcony ringed round with geranium boxes and looked out over their park, sleeping in full white moonlight. Will you laugh too much when I tell you that she wore a white cap and bib and apron, and that he was in the full uniform of the Police Reserve? Of course you and I wouldn't have done that on our wedding night, but they were not twenty-five, either of them; and, though nobody knew it, they were a little romantic! " I shall always love you in it," she said, and kissed the buttons, which simply shows you how many extra kisses she had. "And you really would have married me—you little wonderful thing?" he asked adoringly. " Of course," she said. " Of course, David. Weren't you going to marry me?" "Oh, but that was different," he said, and kissed her again—but not her buttons. And now I know you will laugh when I have to admit that over the nurse's blue and white fell the milky, marvelous pearls that you must have seen in the photographs! Because, you see, though she was romantic and though she had never been in love before, and though she had been perfectly ready to marry a policeman, she was only human after all! HENRY MILNER RIDE UT (Concluded from Page 27) were born in Maine, and their people before them lived in America since there was an America, and even earlier. The chief thing of interest about them is the rather odd name— Norman French, then English—which is, like others, well scattered about the earth, by men who have been soldiers in France, India, America and elsewhere; carillonneurs in Belgium; farmers, foresters — and deer stealers — in England; colonists, lumbermen, shipbuilders, sailors, '49-ers, sea captains, bankers, blacksmiths, horse breeders, and so on. They have not often abandoned their minds to fiction, although a Reverend Jacob Barzillai Rideout once published a book, She Beats the Devil, which dealt with the second sight and other entertaining matters in a household of Canadian farmers and woodsmen. For further information the idle are referred to Miss Una Silberrad's Sampson Rideout, Quaker, and to Mr. J. Prior's excellent novel, Forest Folk. 11 \ Johnson & Johnson New Brunswick, N. J., U. S. A. Explanatory, scientific booklet, covering proper uses of medicated soaps, is enclosed with each cake. Read it.


Bacon - Comrades in Arms
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