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44 THE SATU RDRY EVENING POST February 24, 1940 BEWARE I! 4 OUT r MAY BE OF J VICTIMS So many people today are afraid of Gingivitis with its sore, tender, bleeding gums. And they have a right to be if warning is unheeded! Clinical investigation shows more than 4 out of 5 men, women and even young folks may have this inflammation where gums join the teeth which, IF NEGLECTED, is often a precursor of ravaging Pyorrhea. Only your dentist can help Pyorrhea; but you, yourself, can help guard against Gingivitis. Join Forhan's "Savo Your Tomb" Program See your dentist every 3 months for tooth and gum inspection and twice daily brush teeth and massage gums with Forhan's Toothpaste—formula of Dr. R. J. Forhan for massaging gums. A recent clinical investigation showed over 95% of Gingivitis patients were remarkably helped in just 30 days by following this method. And what a marvelous cleaner! Brushing with Forhan's not only helps brighten dull, dingy teeth to their "natural" lustre— but it helps REMOVE ACID FILM THAT SO OFTEN STARTS TOOTH DECAY. Get a tube of Forhan's TODAY. Note the difference. 39C, IN at drug and department stores. Week-end size at 101 stores. FREE 4 500 GUM MASSAGER Send empty carton from 390 size tube Forhan's Toothpaste to Forhan's, Dept. A-5, New Brunswick, N. J.,and receive this wonderful 50C Gum Massager FREE. (Continued from Page 42 is attached. It doesn't matter. Invariably, these rigid fittings are at highly stressed junctions in the flexible sheetmetal framework of the ship. And it is always these key items which the engineers, because of the difficulty of their design, draw up last. It's one of those things. Engineers do not release the hardest parts first. They just don't. We're doing things about all this, though. For instance, General Blank is beginning to insist on standardization throughout the industry. We've had a certain amount of standardization for some years, but only as concerns nuts, bolts, devises, and the specification for materials. But now Wright Field is beginning to turn the heat on. Some authorities think the present method of buying several makes of the same type of ship from different manufacturers should be discontinued. As it is now, following the competitions, General Blank may authorize the purchase of two or more of the competing aircraft, all of which have been built to the same specifications. The best ship gets the biggest order, and the other manufacturers receive what are called "consolation orders." Under the new plan, all manufacturers would receive cost plus a reasonable profit for their experimental ships. Then a large contract would be let to the manufacturer of the winning ship, and he would be required to license smaller contracts to the other competitors by way of consolation. Thus, instead of a couple of hundred of a half dozen or more types of light bombers, the Army would get for that year an equivalent number of the best of the bombers; thus insuring not only the finest available equipment but the unquestioned advantages of standardization and interchangeability. Help Wanted, Male Another factor which shows promise of improvement is the layout of the manufacturers' plants. Not longer than two years ago, aircraft plants were run on a hit-or-miss basis that completely ignored the location of the different units of production in relation to one another. You were very liable to find the raw stock stored adjacent to the Final-Assembly floor; while the machine shop and the Sheet-Metal Department, which used the raw stock, were likely to be located at the far end of the plant, near the major assembly departments. By this ingenious floor plan, the movement of parts and materials was somewhat as follows: A. Raw stock from the material department was placed on a material truck and carted through Final Assembly, and the Finishing, Heat-Treating, Testing and Wing Assembly departments to: B. The Sheet-Metal Department. Here a part was fabricated, put on another truck and carted back the entire length of the plant to: C. The Subassembly Department; where the part was put into a rib bulkhead, or what have you. The rib bulkhead was then put on a truck and toted - It could go on like that for several pages. A diagram of the travels of the durn thing would have looked like a Rube Goldberg cartoon. Now things are better. We are working toward straight-line production, with Material at one end of the plant and Final Assembly at the other. In the process of this rearrangement, there was a period when you could never be quite sure where you could find anybody or anything. One morning last year I left my desk at about 7 :45 and went down on the floor. Thirty minutes later, I came back up, and found a tool designer hard at work at an enormous drafting table, which occupied the place where my desk had stood half an hour before. " Where did they take me?" I asked him. He shrugged. "I'm darned if I can tell you." "Down at the south end?" "Maybe. It's where Instrument was." "You mean last week ?" "No. Not last week. Week before last." It took me an hour to find my desk. Men I meet on the outside often ask me about my job and the industry. What are its opportunities? What is the best training for it? How much money can you make? I always tell them about the same thing; and as I set it down on paper, it looks rather Horatio Algerish. But I still think it's true. I say that the sky's the limit if you have the stuff. And by " stuff " I don't mean specialized training. What I do mean is native intelligence, initiative and good common horse sense, plus the willingness to work like the very devil and take unlimited responsibility. To get yourself liked and trusted is the hardest step. After that, it's just a matter of learning the business and waiting for the inevitable breaks. Jobs in the aircraft-manufacturing industry fall into three main divisions: Engineering, clerical and mechanical. The minimum qualifications for a junior draftsman are a high-school education, with stress on mathematics, and a sound course in the principles and execution of mechanical drawing and draftsmanship. A man with such qualifications should expect to start at about twenty dollars a week. Advance-- ment will depend on aptitude and later self-education in engineering theory and technique. The holder of a degree in engineering will probably start at about the same rate, but may advance more rapidly, if he is competent. Under clerical help are included all employees not directly concerned with engineering or with mechanical concerns. Production work, for instance, is classed as clerical, although considerable mechanical and technical knowledge is required in the top jobs. Qualifications should include a high-school education. Business training is desirable too. A college man, after a year or so's experience, will get a little better break. Graduates of West Point or Annapolis get themselves hired practically on sight. Mechanical workers in the lowest ranks should be high-school graduates, and it is much in their favor if they have training in descriptive geometry and higher mathematics. Trade-school courses in sheet-metal work, layout, machinist's practice, and so on, are nice things to have under your belt, although they will not affect your starting rate very much. Skilled craftsmen— machinists, toolmakers, woodworkers, foundrymen, and so on—are in great demand, although the wages paid, due to the year-round tenure of employment, will not be so high as the day rate to which they may have been accustomed in job shops where employment is sporadic. Above all, we're looking for adaptability. If you're the type, we'll hire you. You can't buy the specialized training we need. The business is too new. But you can bring us youth, in- dustry, integrity and guts. If you have these qualifications, experience— and the studies experience indicates you should make—will give you your training. And whereas every grown boy and his brother is trying to get into the game, and the competition is, as a result, terrific, I know of no business quicker to recognize genuine ability. Among the mechanical trades practicing in the industry are sheet-metal workers, machinists, metal-parts assemblymen, heat-treaters, metal fitters, welders, electricians, hydraulic mechanics, upholsterers, foundrymen, diemakers, toolmakers, patternmakers, millwrights, plumbers, pipe fitters, radio technicians and carpenters. There's a place in the game for almost anyone. First Flight The average aircraft worker is young. He's about twenty-five years old, highschool educated, and has been in the industry from two to five years. If he's been in the game two years, he'll be a straw boss and will draw about eighty cents an hour. If he's been with us five years and has the stuff, he'll be an assistant foreman, and will pull down forty dollars a week for a forty-hour week, plus overtime. Sometimes he will have been chosen as an inspector— aircraft inspectors are hand-picked from among the best mechanics—in which event he will be paid a little better wage than otherwise. Inspectors, as a class, are better paid than other mechanics. And justly. For the inspection system of an aircraft factory is s o I and I know. I'm a Produc- tion man, and as such, I know my fellow workers' foibles. And in all my years in the industry, I've never run up against a single case in which an aircraft factory's inspection department has failed. in all the grief that is a daily part of the Production man's job, I think, perhaps, I'd like to trade places with some of the others—get a new job that is a little less trouble. But I never do, for long. I'm afraid Production's in my blood. I've quit the department several times and gone into other work, but I've always come back. Reason: boredom. That's one nice thing about Production—you're seldom bored. You haven't time. Too much happens. You're right in the middle of things from the minute a future contract is scheduled right down to the very end of it. Down to the very minute when, the Bomber Division having worked overtime on a seventy-hour week for some six weeks— front office please copy—we roll the first production job out onto the line, tune it up, test it and fly it. The whole plant will turn out to see the first flight of our bomber. There will be cheers from the men, and smiles from the big shots and General Blank. Yes, he'll be there too. But afterward—after Ship No. 1 has opened up its 1500 horses and shot down the runway with its thunder shaking the ground and the air, and bringing the queer, tight feeling into your throat you always have when a ship you've worked on and worried and sweat and lost sleep over first takes the air—after that, your Production man will turn and go slowly back inside the plant. And he won't be cheering. For there will be ninety-nine others just like No. 1 coming down the assembly floor right behind her. Just like her, did I say? Sorry. Not just like her. Trust General Blank and the engineers for that.


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