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1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]

48 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST October 6, 1945 Rey save yaw eyes #01,1 sim Ware YOUR WILLSONITES are needed more than ever when you walk from inside OUT ... into the blinding sun! They'll save your eyes from sun glare... give you safe, clear vision without squinting. Always wear WILLSONITES with the scientific cool green lens. *REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. WILLSON PRODUCTS, INC • READING • PENNSYLVANIA Since 1870, makers of industrial goggles, gas masks, helmets, respirators and sun glasses—temple and clip-on types. Write for FREE Booklet, PROPER EYE CARE FOR SUN AND GLARE. saw him in Paris, it was like running into an old friend, someone from home. I was staying with my aunt in her Paris apartment, and when she had an attack of sinus and wanted to go south, I was having such a wonderful time that I teased until she let me stay behind." Ross Burnham crossed his fingers. Her voice was like someone talking in sleep, and he did not want her to awaken yet. He said, " Will you excuse me a minute?" and left her alone at the table, looking back anxiously before he went swiftly into the dining room where the orchestra was playing. When he returned, she did not look up. " Did you stay alone?" he prompted her. "Jeanne was there. The maid-of-allwork. She'd been with Aunt Marice for fifteen years. I knew lots of people. It was very gay. Buddy was playing at the Oiseau de Passage, and that was the place to go." In the room beyond, the orchestra commenced playing Dancing Cheek to Cheek. Lydia gave no indication of hearing it. " I'd never had a man do the things he did," she said. "Flowers every morning by the bushel. A corsage every afternoon. He even sent me a fur coat, and couldn't understand why I wouldn't keep it. Jewelry that I sent back to him. I was almost never alone with him, except in crowds." Buddy Morino's theme song was weaving a vibrant background to her slow speech. "The first time he asked me to marry him, there were a dozen people at our table. He was so used to crowds that he simply ignored them. It used to fascinate me." Ross Burnham nodded. "Aunt Marice wrote me to come down. Then she began telegraphing and phoning. I suppose it was like you and the mistral. I got stubborn and defiant. When I told Buddy I'd marry him, all my friends talked about the difficulties of Americans getting married in Paris, and that made me stubhomer. Buddy bought me that ring." She looked up at him. " Wasn't it something? You called it a throwing diamond. Kay Divine, when she saw it, said, ' You could kill someone with that,' and I was so—so innocent that I just laughed." Her eyes opened wide, and she jerked her head, at last aware that it was an actual orchestra playing the music which had been pounding in her head. "How strange," she murmured. "Everything's so strange today." This time, when he put his hand over hers, she did not draw away. "Buddy pulled wires and bribed people, and we were married," she said. GAME MAKER (Continued from Page 27) three dozen at a time. I also canvassed Salem, Providence and Worcester, delivering the games to the dealers in suitcases." Within three weeks, all five hundred copies had been disposed of, and for better or for worse—mostly for better—young Parker found himself in the game business. With his profits he repeated his experience with a new edition of 2000 games of Banking. In 1887, when Parker was twenty, his business turned what all selfrespecting authors of success stories call "the corner." Instead of ending the year with a profit balance of a few hundred dollars, he found a few—a "He had a tremendous party in his suite. I didn't like it much, be- cause Oh well." She shrugged. "I went into one of the bedrooms to get away for a while, and he and Kay Divine were there. He was kissing her, and he didn't see me right away. She looked up and laughed and said, `You've got the name, Lydia. You're Mrs. Morino.'" "Lydia," said Ross Burnham softly. "He slapped her across the mouth. I'd never seen a man hit a woman like that. It caught her off balance and she fell down on the floor, and he stepped over her as if she'd been a—a rug, and put out his arms to me. He said he could explain and that, after all, he and Kay " She looked at Ross Burn- ham. "I was so dumb I hadn't known. I suppose I was the only person in Paris who didn't know." "Poor little Lydia," he said. "So you ran away." "Yes," she agreed. "I ran away. And I decided that never again, as long as I lived " Her voice stopped. "Never again, what?" he asked. ' "That's all," she said. "It isn't all," he contradicted. "This man today " Her lips set firmly. " You don't have to tell me, you know," he assured her. "I can guess. I could almost draw you a portrait of him. Older than you, a lot. Quiet, re- strained " Her eyes were wide. "How do you PI He laughed. " I'm getting even with you for this afternoon in the gallery." His hand was holding hers tightly. " I didn't need binoculars. Simple deduction, my dear Watson. The swing of the pendulum." She was staring at him. "Now you're at normal," he told her. "Now everything is set. We really pick up the threads now—after seven years." His voice was excited. " Lydia— I should have known that you were named Lydia—didn't you ever think of the young man in the garden?" Her mouth trembled, not yet smiling, but beginning to smile. "Oh, a little," she admitted. "I thought a lot about the girl in the dark," he said. "I'm not trying to draw a long bow. You can't fall in love with a girl you've never seen." "Or with a man who has never seen you," she added. His eyes held hers. "It's light now," said Ross Burnham. "Light enough to see a lot. And as I told you a while back—and it's incontrovertible, Lydia—sooner or later, night must fall." Her smile broke through. "You think so? " she asked. " I know it," he answered. very few—thousand dollars in the till. He even had a sizable crew of employees. As the business developed, Parker's two older brothers, Charles and Edward—they are both dead now—came into the business with him, hence the company's name. Of the games that Parker published during the first dozen years of his enterprise, nine out of every ten grew from the same fertile imagination that had envisaged Banking. After that, games and ideas for games began to arrive in Salem from every corner of the globe. Innocence Abroad—a travel game, and George Parker's first really great board-game success—was invented by a lady named Shephard, but Parker remodeled it. Such was the (Continued on Page 50)


1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]
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