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1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]

.50 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST October 6, 1945 1/41/PSNIEY 000110 //#4/k AXLE GREAS TAU SATURDAY EVENING POST "The house is exactly as I left it. What have you been up to?" WED TO K/41/7101/ agt5/ SaaTeited: This man with carelessly groomed, unruly hair didn't even get in the race. Why doesn't someone tip him off how Kreml keeps hair neatly groomed —so trim and spruce-looking all day long? And doesn't he look it with his hair plastered down so silly with grease! No wonder girls 'turn on the ice' when he asks for a date! Kreml grooms hair so handsomely yet never leaves it looking or feeling oily or greasy. His shoulders are covered with ugly dandruff flakes. What girl would even place a bet on him! Kreml is famous to promptly relieve itching of dry scalp and remove dandruff flakes. (Continued from Page 48) vogue of the Parker version that in 1890, when it was first brought out, he journeyed to New York to hire a loft at Fifth Avenue and 16th Street in which to store his stock and pack the game. He also ran an Innocence Abroad advertising campaign in the daily papers—the first time a game publisher had had the temerity to do such a thing on any sizable scale. The word "publisher" is no mis- nomer, for Parker Brothers thinks of itself as a publisher and not a manufacturer. Each game it produces is called "a copy" and the company brings out its products in "editions." "We edit a game as a publisher edits a manuscript," says Robert Barton. " Parker Brothers sometimes buys its games outright and sometimes publishes them on a royalty basis. A sale of 25,000 to 50,000 copies of a game is regarded as only a moderately successful run. We won't publish one unless they think it worth an initial print order of at least 5000." Like any other publishing house in existence for more than half a century, its list of titles would be useful to a researcher delving into fads, crazes, fancies, history and literature. But Parker Brothers' titles are more revealing than any book publisher's list. There was the Yale-Harvard football game of 1896, brilliantly packaged, with shaggy-haired giants in quilted jerseys pushing and pulling on the cover of the box. Other Parker titles have included a Sherlock Holmes game, a Boer and British War game, Pollyanna— the glad girl—Office Boy—the Horatio Alger motif again—Uncle Remus and Br'er Rabbit, Gold Hunt — Klondike—Adventures on Wheelscycling— Rough Riders, Battle of Manila and Port Arthur. Among the Parker Brothers' games invented to take advantage of the sales boost afforded by a tie-up with a wellknown name or phrase are Donald Duck, Snow White, Winnie the Pooh, and Hi Ho, Silver. Innocence Abroad was certainly not hindered by the similarity of its title to the Mark Twain best seller, although the spelling differed slightly from the name of the Samuel Clemens book. Still in step with the times, Highway Patrol—a game sponsored by the National Safety Council—and Race Among the Planets are now rolling off the presses. Apparently, an idea that once lends itself successfully to a game remains always good, and Parker Brothers is one place where reincarnation is an established fact instead of a theory. Their current version of Innocence Abroad is Hendrik van Loon's Travel Game. The 1896 Yale-Harvard football game has its modern counterpart in Tom Hamilton's football game. Sherlock Holmes' successor is a game planned • with the help of Mystery Writer S. S. Van Dine. Boer and British, Battle of Manila and Rough Riders were the predecessors of such present-day successes as Commandos and the Army Air Corps. The Mansion of Happiness was reissued not so very long ago, and found a receptive market, although Parker Brothers was disturbed to find that people were purchasing it under the delusion that they were buying an antique— a misconception not discouraged by unscrupulous antique dealers. There is, however, one game the company has permanently shelved. The game of Witchcraft was dropped when the embarrassed descendants of those New Englanders who took part in the seventeenth-century witch hunt asked that it be discontinued. With a few exceptions, Parker Brothers owns almost all the well-known proprietary games. Certain games such as chess, checkers, Chinese checkers and tiddlywinks are "open" games—that is, they are in the public domain. Parcheesi—the first of the pursuit, or race, games—is an ancient Hindu game. There is a distinction between a toy and a game. A game is made to play, instead of to play with. A game is a contest. The most perfect type of game, George Parker feels, is a contest between two people, but the most popular games are those for more than two people, and four is perfect as far as popularity goes. On the average, three and a half people play a Parker game. Parker Brothers have never gone in for gambling games. They prefer what they call "home" games. Nor have they ever made a game capable of injuring a child physically. The colored dyes they use are harmless vegetable ones that any moppet can lick without getting a bellyache. Their dart games are never made with pointed metal darts. They are tipped with a rubber suction cup instead. With the exception of George Parker himself, there are few Mary Roberts Rineharts, Booth Tarkingtons or Clarence Budington Kellands in the business of authoring games. Hundreds of (Continued on Page 52) raloti,t" And notice how the prettiest girls ask to meet 'the man with the handsome looking hair.' Kreml keeps hair neat as a pin—so lustrous— so masculine looking— yet never leaves it pasted down or feeling greasy or sticky. • Kreml Hair Tonic is famous to keep hair neatly groomed all day long—it leaves it so lustrous, looking as if it had some 'body' to it. Kreml never pastes your hair down or leaves it looking greasy or oily. Ask for Kreml at your barber shop. Buy a bottle at your drug counter. KREML HAIR TONIC Keeps Hair Better .Groomed Without Looking Greasy. Relieves Itching of Dry Scalp — Removes Dandruff Flakes


1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]
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