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1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]

flop out of bed flAPPY Try this tonight for morning freshness! Why struggle to wake up and get go- inf —half-awake and half-alive! Try eas wy t housds are using to outs of bed— bounce an buoyant, vital eager to meet the day. Just drink a cup of Ovaltine at bedtime each night. For Ovaltine does three freshness.things to bring vigorous to it promotes First—taken warm at bedtidmruegs. sound sleep without Second—it furnishes food elements to build up vitality while you sleep: Third—it also supplies extra vita mins and minerals in a delicious, more natural way for all-round health and vigor. why not turn to Ovaltine—starting So tonight! OVALTINE Tar , arf ALWAYS A STEP AHEAD IN THE STYLE PARADE 841 W JACKSON BLVD. CHICAGO 7. ILL. Sold by Leading Dealers Everywhere THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 53 Wearever Pace- maker set in line gift box, $3.75 "and we tried to sell them in New York for him, but the game hadn't penetrated that far east and we sent them back to him." Hardly had they arrived back in California when, overnight, all forty-eight states went mahjongg wacky. Parker persuaded Babcock to put his trademark and copyright into the firm's hands, and began to produce sets. By that time, thousands upon thousands of stores were selling sets of tiles for mah-jongg games with or without title or benefit of copyright, and the injunctions necessary to protect Babcock's rights would have run virtually into infinity, and it was obvious that Babcock could never receive the financial reward his pioneer In 1929, George Parker gave some thought to the ambitious project of inventing a game that would be faster than checkers and as fascinating as chess. In a game called Camelot he came amazingly near achieving his ambition, and there are many who believe It had been one of Parker's beliefs that you cannot improve on a wellestablished game like checkers, for the reason that the public will not stand for having an old favorite's face lifted. He still feels that way about it, but Camelot was sufficiently different from checkers to take it out of the facelifting category. There was already in existence an old game of his called Chivalry, played on a board that looked like an overgrown chessboard. Parker took Chivalry, brooded over it, experimented with it throughout a trip up the River Nile with his brother Charles, drew up new rules and emerged with Camelot. George Parker thinks Camelot is his finest " origination " in board games of skill. Such chess greats as the champions Capablanca, Lasker and Frank Marshall wrote glowing letters of tribute to its publishers after playing it. " The play of the game results in delightful combinations and absorbing problems not at all like those of chess, nor restricted to those of checkers," said the man to whom the mysteries of this game were revealed under the shadow of the Pyramids. ttO Air The familiar phenomena following in the train of a successful game made themselves apparent. Photographs appeared in the papers showing Anne Morgan playing Camelot with Capeblame. Cartoonists drew pictures captioned "Einstein could be a bear at Camelot." Chorus girls played it for news photographers. After spending a month writing a book on how to be an expert, Cameloter Sidney Lenz, the bridge expert, anticlimactically lost a game to a man who claimed that he had never played it before. A still newer game craze—together with the depression years in which a fairly expensive game found hard sledding— cut the sale of Camelot. Taken up by Social Registerites wintering in Florida, Backgammon became the sophisticated, upper-price-bracket game of the moment. In 1932-33, picture puzzles staged a comeback—this time as much cheaper games stamped out of heavy cardboard on a mass-production basis. The picture puzzles that Parker Brothers made to take advantage of the revival, however, were made in the traditional piecework fashion. In 1938-39, a Parker game, Crossword Lexicon, along with Chinese checkers, had its day in the sun. But beginning in January of 1935, and running wild through '36, '37 and '38, a game called Monopoly eclipsed anything that had gone before it. " Monopoly violated some old ideas of what a good game should be," says Robert Barton. "A successful game should be simple, shouldn't take too long to play, and even children should find it easy to learn. Here we had a game that took at least two hours to complete until we made rules for a `short' Monopoly game and it involved such highly specialized things as mortgages and the buying and selling of real estate. But we stopped worrying when we found that ten-year-olds as well as their parents took to it like lightning." George Parker had had super-game hits before in picture puzzles, Pingpong and Pit—which sold 300,000 copies in two months and 1,000,000 in CH,1R7, JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT WY DEC • JoHNARISfl3tEy work deserved. he succeeded. THE SATURDAY EVENING POST "Boy, did we have some excitement around here last month." WEAKENER STAND-OUT in 3 new ways 1. NEW VALUE: 14 Karat Gold point; larger ink capacity; "C- Flow" feed; telescope-precision construction. 2. NEW"WRITE-ABILITY": Finest,smoothestwriting pen ever made by America's Largest Fountain Pen Manufacturer. 3. NEW BEAUTY: Advance, fit-the-hand design, interpreted in distinctive pearly stripes. In maroon,golden brown, green and black; with matching pencil. Made by David Kahn, Inc., North Bergen, N. J. (Established 1896) Other Jinni's WEAREVER selertiens: DeLaxe pee $1.00, set $1.90: Zenith Pen $1.95, set $2.75. WEAREVER Refill Leads • • America's' Lanrst Ainfrzin Pen Manilieturer e,••5 D K INC


1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]
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