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1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]

54 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST October 6,1945 "PROTECTING THE AMERICAN HOME" Following the American Revolution Colonel Jacob Davis built his first log cabin in Montpelier as his postwar home. He didn't need a mortgage, and a kettle was about all his kitchen equipment, but things are different now. "Postwar" is here . . . And so is "Packaged Mortgage" "Postwar," lately just a hopeful phrase, is now a reality. Significant improvements in living are awaited with great expectations. National Life's "Packaged Mortgage" is one such significant improvement — a novel improvement in home financing. It means that you can finance a home and major kitchen appliances— gas and electric ranges, refrigerators, home laundries, deep-freeze units and other equipment—all under one loan from only one lender at lower interest cost than through the old-time installment buying. The total monthly payments are uniform over the life of the loan instead of being heavy during the first few years. National Life of Vermont with $300,- 000,000 assets is the first large-scale financing institution to offer the "Packaged Mortgage" and offers it on the threshold of the greatest homebuilding and home-buying era probably America has known. Send for folder and name of nearest loan correspondent. Log cabin builders didn't need mortgages but you probably do and you will save money if you buy your home on the "packaged" plan. Use coupon below. twelve—but Monopoly was the alltime high in game crazes and, to date, it still is. Piles of telegraphed orders filled laundry baskets in the Parker Brothers' offices. Son-in-law Robert Barton visited the office-machinery companies in Boston and offered to pay them almost any price if they would handle the increased bookkeeping the Monopoly boom created. They took one look and refused. "It was like trying to cap six oil gushers at once, and they were afraid they'd fail," says Barton, who calls those frenzied days, "like wading under Niagara Falls." More than two decades ago, a Chicagoian, Mrs. Elizabeth M. Phillips, a woman with a bent for inventing games, came to see George Parker in his New York office, bringing with her a game she had designed called The Landlord's Game. The Parkers had already published a game of hers called Mock Trial. The basis of the Landlord game was political. It followed the tax principles of Henry George which had the debating clubs of the country in a tizzy—a fact that made it too "special" in its appeal. Also Parker thought it too complicated. " But I gave Mrs. Phillips some friendly advice," said Parker, "and she patented certain elements of her game—elements afterward evident in the game Monopoly. She published her Landlord game herself and sold it through friends and a group of shops." Mrs. Phillips later improved her game and patented certain other features of it. Then a Philadelphia heating engineer, Charles B. Darrow, altered and improved the game and introduced other features which he too protected by patents and copyrights. The name Monopoly was used by Mrs. Phillips as a label for a later attempt at working out a board game, and Parker Brothers now acquired both her patents and her copyrights. Darrow manufactured some copies of his version of the game, branded them Monopoly and sold them to some of his friends and disposed of other copies through a Philadelphia department store. Realizing that the game needed handling by people familiar with game exploitation on a national scale, he came to Parker Brothers, with the upshot that after all this backing and filling, the firm became the owners of the game bombshell, Monopoly. Monopoly was more than just a game that caught on like crazy. It THE SUN DANCE (Continued from Page 16) not steady. But Porcupine was tired and would not notice. "No joke!" the little man retorted angrily. "On the telephone the news came . . . to the hotel . . . to the post office . . . to Nick's place. The white man at the railroad station said he would not take out the telegram because nobody in Agency was ever at home. He said to find you." Mary's hand flew up to seal her lips in the old gesture of astonishment, a gesture so old that she had never noticed that she used it. She stood up slowly. "What shall I do?" she asked. Porcupine was pleased. He had been the bearer of important tidings, and he was being asked for advice. Also, he had his breath back now and could thrust out his little chest. He waited, however, for a fitting interval before replying, to give gravity to his words. became a national byword. Inspired by the fact that it was reputed to take endless hours to play, cartoonists drew pictures showing characters saying brightly, "You'll like Monopoly after the first forty-eight hours." Newspapers published editorials on it. The game involved such items as real estate, hotels and railroads, and costume-jewelry bracelets appeared with small replicas of all these things jangling from them. And the new mania was written up in news magazines. No one knows how many copies of Monopoly have been sold except Parker Brothers, and, for what they regard as good and sufficient trade reasons, they won't tell. But the statement has been made—it has ndver been challenged—that the figure runs well over 4,000,000. A visitor popping into the Parker home of an evening—it is a collector'sitem, century-old home on Salem's famous Chestnut Street—will probably find its proprietor relaxing by the fire with Mrs. Parker or a guest over a game of Camelot or Crossword Lexicon. Just before last Christmas, a little girl, her galoshes squeaking against the snow blanketing Salem streets, came face to face with a bright-eyed gentleman wearing mustaches and whiskers as snowy as the ground underfoot. Recognition lit her eyes. "I know who you are," she said. " You're Santa Claus." Although George Parker's beard does not flow along Clausian lines, the Salem moppet was not being completely whimsical. She was talking to the moving spirit of a business housed in buildings whose interiors look not unlike Kriss Kringle's workshop. The Christmas-presenty smell of glue, cardboard and colored ink hangs on the air in the Parker Brothers' workrooms. And in a year when the metal for red wagons and electric trains had gone to war, the largest publisher of games in the world was doing his best to be Santa Claus' helper. George Parker, despite his seventyeight years, is as interested in game making as he was when he first trotted games of Banking around in a suitcase and melted the glacial sales resistance of New England merchants with youthful get-up-and-get. Perhaps even now the seed of a game to be called When Johnny Comes Marching Home or Up and Atom may be germinating in his mind. "First, we get your father. Then we get the telegram." Mary turned and started into the council house. "No!" called Porcupine sharply. " I get him!" He hobbled up the steps past her and into the building, with a gesture of the hand which thrust her back. A young woman could not interrupt the council, the gesture said, on a personal matter. Mary stood dumbly, waiting. In a surprisingly short time, her father came striding strongly through the door toward her, followed by the scuffling steps of Porcupine. She stole a quick glance at her father's stern face, read sympathy in his eyes, and turned away from him. He did not speak. Runs Swiftly had never spoken English, and claimed he could not understand it, but many suspected that he could, and merely used the time required for interpreting to marshal his thoughts before replying to a white man. (Continued on Page 57) NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY HOME OFFICE— MONTPELIER, VERMONT A Mutual Company, founded in 1850, "as solid as the granite hills of Vermont" NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., DEPT. 110, MONTPELIER, VERMONT Without obligation, please send me folder about the "Packaged Mortgage", and name of nearest loan correspondent. Name Busineis or Home Addreff CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON


1945_10_06--026_SP [Game Maker]
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