Page 1

1962_07_28--022_SP Guadalcanal

July 28—August 4,1962 65 ships and almost as many more transports, auxiliaries, motor torpedo boats and small craft. Guadalcanal and Tulagi became important advanced bases for American amphibious forces until Operation "Watchtower" was completed in February, 1944. with the neutralization of Rabaul. Guadalcanal has now reverted to its primitive condition. Jungle growth soon covered the extensive camps, the supply dumps and the abandoned tanks and vehicles. The island is one of memories and ghosts. The natives have strange tales of spectral banzai charges ashore and of You won't catch our friends using this. phantom naval battles offshore. They even say that the wreck of a Japanese warship is visible on a bright day at low water, with rusting planes still secured to her deck, and the skulls of dead sailors caught under the wreckage grinning up at you through the now-clear waters of Ironbottom Sound. THE END northward. Next, the four destroyers in Lee's van encountered two Japanese destroyers, steaming so close to Savo Island that radar was useless. The ensuing destroyer battle was disastrous to the Americans. Preston and Walke were sunk, and the other two went out of action. Lee pressed on with two battleships only, his men tossing out life rafts to the destroyer sailors as they passed over their ships' graves. Now South Dakota's luck ran out. She suffered an electrical-power failure, so that the only help she could give Lee was to absorb numerous hits which might have crippled his other battleship. Washington picked up Kirishima on her radar, and at midnight opened up on her at 8400 yards' range. Nine of her seventy-five sixteen-inch shells, and forty five-inch shells scored; and within seven minutes the Japanese battleship, steering gear wrecked and topsides aflame, was out of the battle. Admiral Lee now directed lone Washington to the northwestward to draw off the enemy cruisers and destroyers that were punishing South Dakota, and succeeded in so doing. At 0025 on 15 November, Kondo decided he had had enough and retired. The Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, which had begun on the afternoon of 12 November, was over. Washington and South Dakota rejoined south of Guadalcanal at 0900; helpless Kirishima had already been scuttled. Roadside trouble is about the last thing our friends think of any more. You see, the day they got Lifeliners — Cooper's new no-trouble tire — they got rid of tire problems. For Lifeliners are made with amazing "turbo-mixed" rubber . . . a rubber that actually increases tire life as much as 50%. In miles, that's a good 10 to 20 thousand more than you get from ordinary tires. (Now you know why our customers are friends!) We have your safety in mind, too. The cord body of Cooper Lifeliner nylon premiums is 2 1/2 times as strong as U. S. Govt. standards for new car tires. Yet Lifeliners cost about 30% less than other major premium tires. And Cooper's Protective Service (PS) Guarantee goes beyond that of any other major tire maker . . . fully covers accidental road hazard damage, plus workmanship and materials: (1) For 3 years regardless of tread wear. (2) For full life of tread after 3-year guarantee expires.' Most Cooper dealers offer easy-pay plans. Why not switch to Coopers and forget about tire tools and tire troubles from now on? Cooper Tire & Rubber Company, Findlay, Ohio. Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, Industrial Products. 'Allowances based on Protective Service (PS) schedule posted at point-of-sale. The only tire change many people ever make...is to Cooper. COOPER TIRES U. S. Shift to the Offensive This night battleship action was excellently fought. Admiral Lee had a positive doctrine that he maintained, despite the loss of his entire destroyer screen. He made quick, accurate analyses from the information on his radar. Washington, conned by Capt. Glenn Davis and directed by Admiral Lee with a skill and imperturbability worthy of old George, saved the day for the United States. The conclusion of this battle marked a definite shift of America from defensive to offensive, and of Japan in the opposite direction. Fortune now for the first time smiled on the Allies everywhere: not only here but in North Africa, at Stalingrad, and in Papua. President Roosevelt, while mourning the loss of his friend Dan Callaghan, announced, "It would seem that the turning point in this war has at last been reached." Churchill chose this moment to proclaim "the end of the beginning." And a captured Japanese document admitted: "It must be said that the success or failure in recapturing Guadalcanal Island, and the vital naval battle related to it, is the fork in the road which leads to victory for them or for us." The war followed the right fork for us. It was rough, tough and uncharted, but it led to Tokyo. Two more naval battles, sundry skirmishes and frequent ground actions were required before the Japanese finally evacuated their remaining forces from Guadalcanal on 9 February 1943. Ironbottom Sound is paved with the hulks of sunken ships and the bones of sailors. Each side, in the six-month-long campaign, lost twenty-four combatant


1962_07_28--022_SP Guadalcanal
To see the actual publication please follow the link above