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1985_09_01--142_SP Her Honor Rancher's Daughter

THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 47 The first lady of the land and the first lady on the Court, with President Reagan and Chief Justice Warren Burger. Justice O'Connor joins her colleagues in hearing oral arguments between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays for approximately two weeks of each month. Visitors are invited, up to a limit of 218, on a first-come, firstserved basis. Astonishment at the judicial ambience is not unknown. One man said he had expected the justices to "talk in Latin or something." A high-school girl was shocked that a black-robed justice could rock comfortably in his highback chair and actually laugh out loud. (Justices are privileged to choose a chair for their individual comfort.) Laughter, however, is not indigenous to the high court. The stresses of the place understandably make for an air of aloofness. To reach the Supreme Court, cases must turn on principles of law or constitutional issues of far-reaching importance. From more than 5,000 petitions a year, the Court hears arguments on perhaps 150. "We are very quiet here," Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes once remarked, "but it is the quiet of a storm center." Sandra Day O'Connor, regarded by most as a judicial conservative except when it comes to sex discrimination, already knows that storm center well. She has always shown particular interest in equality for women. She states: "1 worked hard to try to eliminate what I saw or judged as legal impediments in the way of letting women progress and meet their career goals. I think that after women got the right to vote, they pretty much sat down for a long period of time and packed their banners and stayed quiet. It wasn't until the '60s that women began to bring to the forefront the continuing concerns that they had about equal opportunity. I am sure that but for that effort, I would not be serving in this job, because people obtained a greater consciousness of the need for women in these positions. "There were not as many women working, at least in the professions, in the days when I was starting out in the legal profession," says Justice O'Connor. "In fact, there were only a handful. We used to meet in Arizona, the women lawyers there, about once a month—and initially we could sit around a very small table indeed. Through the years it grew." As for role models, the justice says: "A woman judge in Arizona named Norma Lockwood became the first woman chief justice of the state supreme court. Her father had been a lawyer and a judge, and she became a legislator and a judge. She was very helpful to the women lawyers in those days and would meet with us. We thought that was a wonderful encouragement." Does she foresee the day when as many as half the Supreme Court will be female justices? "I surely would continued on page 109 The Post Decides in Favor of the Justice's Recipes Although her friends testify to her reputation as a five-star cook, the hectic schedule of a Supreme Court justice leaves Sandra Day O'Connor little time to indulge in her culinary relaxation. When she does have a chance to demonstrate her talents in the kitchen, her native Southwestern background comes out in such personal creations as the Crab Enchiladas and Tomatillo Sauce below. Upon trying her recipes in our test kitchens, we agree that she has done them justice. Crab Enchiladas (Serves 4) 1 dozen corn tortillas 2 cups crab meat 2 cups or more grated cheese— mild Cheddar or jack cheese 1 bunch green onions, chopped Tomatillo Sauce Heat 1/2 cup cooking oil in small skillet and dip each tortilla into oil for a few seconds: turn over once. Remove and drain on paper towels. Salt each one lightly. Lay some crab meat, green onions and cheese in a row across the middle of each tortilla. Roll up and lay seam side down in a baking dish that will hold all of them in a single layer. Cover with tomatillo sauce and more grated cheese. Bake uncovered at 350° F. in oven for 20 minutes or more, until bubbly. Serve with chopped lettuce and cherry-tomato halves as garnish. Tomatillo Sauce Put all contents of 2 cans of canned green tomatillos in food processor along with 1/2 Spanish onion, 1 clove garlic and 2 or 3 jalapeno chilies with seeds and stems removed. Blend. In saucepan melt 3 tablespoons margarine; add 3 tablespoons flour. Stir. Add tomatillo mix and cook gently until somewhat thickened; stir as needed.


1985_09_01--142_SP Her Honor Rancher's Daughter
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