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1947_11_29--022-Houston

TFC RC WHEN YOU BUY INNERSPRING MATTRESSES OR UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE, BE SURE THEY ARE BUILT WITH All NACHMAN Spring Products are tested, Inspected and approved by the Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory. 21 Wonder of wonders! Toby's become a miracle man, transforming ancient chairs into things of beauty with Hudson's Speedway Lektrik Paint Gun. NI, ire miracles on page 61. THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 55 $13.30* For chasing chills from ony room where extra heat is needed, you can't beat the Arvin 213 Fan-Forced Heater. Handsome in tan baked-enamel finish, simulating bronze. Convenient switch mounted in front. No radio interference from motor. 7,;••nn‘. 0-* $11.95* h..' 1'1 4/$;) Shower or shave in comfort ... dry hair quickly. You'll like the Arvin 101 Fan-Forced Heater I With pastel-green enamel finish. Hand-grip in back. Some heating fan unit as deluxe models. $9.80* For every room, the Arvin 52 Radiant Type Heater is a portable electric fireplace. Long, heavy-duty heat-unit, wound on porcelain, provides quick comfort in any room. $9.95* You Jusi Arrange - You Never Cliange RU SCO bteed SELF STORING COMBINATION Screen and Storm Sash By finger tip control, from inside, Rusco is instantly available as storm sash or screen provides year 'round, rainproof, draft-free, filtered-screen ventilation. Rusco is the answer to window convenience, comfort, safety and economy . they pay for themselves in fuel savings. Write today for descriptive booklet. The F. C. Russell Co. 6400SE HERMAN AVENUE, CLEVELAND 2, OHIO NACHMAN Toted Spring Constructions Shamaki screamed like an eagle, shook his long sleeves and jumped among the startled horses, pulling loose their halter ropes and driving them off into the moonlight. The door of the tower stayed dark. But feet rasped on stone and men called out. Shad heard Semyon's familiar wail of fright, shut off quick. Then there was quiet, as if those inside were trying to size up what was happening to them. Quiet, broken by the rapping of an automatic pistol. There was a soft rushing, like the twisting of struggling animals. A rifle whanged off, lighting an embrasure. The pistol echoed it, searching for an elusive target. Shad, wiping the sweat from his eyes, remembered how Anya had said that men who lit a fire in the ruined castle would be visited by a devil. The silence that followed set his nerves on edge. Then he heard feet running. Close together, four men broke from the doorway. Not one of these was hurt, but they acted as if mad with fear. Swerving away from the body by the fire, they ran to where the horses had been tethered, then broke away again, disappearing into the moonlight. Faintly, Shad heard the echo of Shamaid's laughter. Ayub came out alone, holding to the wall. On his shoulder he gripped Semyon, who whimpered. When he climbed the stones slowly, Shad heard him breathing like a tired animal. He had to help the big man climb into the jeep- At the door of Anya's room there was a good light from the fire. Ayub carried the boy in and then set him down. For the first time,Shad saw how the injured man was bleeding from the HOUSTON (Continued from Page 23) money is spent, Houston still won't have enough of anything—streets, downtown eating places, hotels, homes, drainage or schools. Today, because of inadequate plant, some Houston children can be schooled for only half a day. Yet, since the beginning, that has almost always been Houston's story: the exciting agonies of hurried growth. The whole thing started out as a routine real-estate-promotion scheme. It was initiated by two brothers named Allen. J. K. was the contact man, the generator of contagious enthusiasm, and his brother, A. C., was the quiet one who looked at you over the top of his spectacles and decided what was what. Soon after Gen. Sam Houston defeated the Mexican General Santa Anna at the near-by battlefield of San Jacinto in 1836, the Allen brothers acquired the land on which Houston now stands. It cost a dollar an acre, fifty cents down. They laid off streets through the wild woods and prairie. More to the point, they named their unpeopled city after the most adored and dashing man in Texas. Then they began their spiel. . In newspaper ads back in the United States they extolled Houston, which they spoke of as being "situated at the head of navigation, on the west bank of Buffalo Bayou." They did not add that it was navigable only by rowboats. Writing of this time, Mrs. Dilue Harris, a distinguished early settler, has said: "There was so much excitement about the city of Houston that some of the young men in the neighborhood . . . visited it. . . . It was hard work to chest and hip; the flesh of one cheek had been ripped open. Semyon straddled his legs and hurried to his mother. She picked him up, but she was staring at Ayub, sweating and swaying on his feet. She said, "Chleb sol." Taking his hand, she drew him over to the bench. Making him sit down, she began to pull off his dirty jacket, staring at him as if afraid. When she had heated water in the caldron on the fire, she washed the big man's wounds with clean garments hanging by the fire. As she did so, she pressed her cheek against the good side of his head happily. "Early tonight," she cried at Shad, "when I called him bad names, he told me something! At Kiev, Ayub was many days in the house-to-house fighting. Yes, there he found Mi'hail hurt, and carried him out. But Mi'hail died. Now tonight he promised me that he would bring Semyon out of the house, and Semyon would be alive." Carefully, she began to pull off Ayub's boots and help him to lie down in her bed. " He is bad sick," she said. Although she spoke to Shad, she didn't seem to know he was there. Daybreak came soon, and when it did, Shad Donovan got up from the bench where he had been sitting and put another log on the fire. When he looked at Anya asleep under a sheepskin on the floor by the bed, with her hand touching Ayub's scarred head, he did not wake her to ask if, after all, she did not want him to take her and the kid down to Tiflis. He knew the answer to that, and he eased himself out to his jeep without waking any of the family. THE END find. . . . When they did, it consisted of one dugout canoe, a bottle gourd of whisky, a surveyor's chain, and was inhabited by four men with an ordinary camping outfit." But the Allens were so unrelenting in their publicity campaign that when the brand-new congress of the Republic of Texas met in Columbia to select a provisional capital, they swallowed the Aliens' bait, chose Houston, and voted $15,000 to erect a building "suitable for the accommodation of the congress of the republic and such other buildings as may be necessary." After the Allens had pulled off this remarkable coup, it was a breeze to convince a man named Lubbock that he should buy a stock of groceries and start up the bayou on a small sternwheel steamboat. No such boat had ever come so far up the bayou, and the Laura was three days making the last twelve miles, where the bayou bristled with snags that had to be torn out. By now, several houses were being built. There was a big tent which contained a saloon, and an influx of immigrants, seldom since arrested, began. There were game and wild cattle in the woods, an, abundance of blue-gray Spanish moss for stuffing mattresses and pillows, joints of cane to be whittled into forks and spoons. All but domestic produce was naturally dear. Most of all, there were the rain, the bottomless mud and the mosquitoes. For many a subsequent year the annual yellow-fever epidemics would carry off Houstonians literally by the ton. At the celebration of the first anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto, the halyard got stuck in the top of the flagpole, and President Houston gave a sailor a town lot for skinning up the pole and setting things aright. That There's plenty of warmth for baby's bath with the Arvin 203A Fan-Forced Heater. Completely safe with bright finished grille. Handsome in ivory baked-enamel finish. Toe-switch control, hand-grip in back. Red glow-light gives fireplace effect. All Arvins are Underwriters' Listed for Your Protection *Prices slightly higher in Zone 2 NOBLITT-SPARKS INDUSTRIES, INC. Columbus, Indiana


1947_11_29--022-Houston
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