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1947_11_29--022-Houston

THE SATURDAY EVENING POST November 29, 1947 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST "Look at that crowd—and not a dead one in the lot. . . Punching out phenomenal quantities of electric motor laminations—such as these— is only one of many thousands of benefits night, in a black-velvet suit and a scarlet waistcoat, red-topped, silverspurred boots, the hero of San Jacinto, despite the still-troublesome ankle wound he'd sustained in that battle, offered his arm to the wife of Capt. Mosely Baker and led the first cotillion. Then, at noon on May 5, 1837, he entered the still roofless government building and addressed a joint session of congress. But these exciting days were not to last. Ultimately, a western bloc forced the removal of the government to what is now Austin, and has kept it there ever since, except for one brief interval when old Sam slipped it back to his namesake city. However, all this squabbling over the location of the seat of government took on a somewhat less meaningful tone when, in 1846, after Texas, pretty much on its own terms, entered the Union, President Anson Jones reverently lowered the Lone Star flag and hauled up Old Glory in its place. Nevertheless, Houston grew, became more and more of a shallow-draft cattle port and lumber center. When, at the approach of the Civil War, Sam Houston was unable to keep his rambunctious state from seceding, the town of Houston served as something of a lair for blockade runners, and on one occasion mounted a sea attack by using river steamers that had been equipped with cannon and wore armor belts of cotton bales to absorb and contain enemy projectiles. These vessels succeeded in ramming and sinking at least one of the foe and in recapturing Galveston from the Yankees. But in the end, of course, Houston had to go through the humiliation of defeat and reconstruction. Much of her post-Civil War spleen she vented on Galveston, which, in the 1870's, was the largest and richest city in Texas. Galveston's only rail connection with the rest of Texas ran through Houston, where shipments to and from Galves- ton were usually delayed. Worse yet, each fall, when the cotton season was at its height, Houston, on the grounds that a case of yellow fever had been reported, would slap a quarantine on the port of Galveston. Poor Galveston ultimately had to build a railroad of her own, one that cautiously went out of its way to avoid her coiled and rattling neighbor. By the time the 1890's rolled around, resurgent Houston was kicking up its heels and having fun just like other cities. It had grown so steadily that it now had four railroad shops, mills for pressing oil from cottonseed, several carriage and wagon factories, a soap factory, breweries, and enough sawmills to turn out 400,000 feet of lumber each day. It was running an impressive amount of shallow-draft cargo down the bayou to Galveston and was already at work deepening the channel to the sea. The flat, easily irrigable lands around Houston were producing more and more rice. In 1901 the first well of the Spindletop field in Beaumont, ninety miles away, blew in. Houston was the nearest important wholesale center, and its golden era as an oil capital had begun. In 1904 the Moonshine well came in at adjacent Humble, a word which in Texas is almost always spelled with a capital " H " and means not what Webster says, but, like the words "Gulf," "Texaco" and "Shell," signifies oil, money and power. The near-by Goose Creek field came in in 1908. Each year the Federal Government was pouring more millions into the deepening of the ship channel. Big buildings were shooting up around town—banks, department stores, hotels. Forty blocks of the north side burned down and Houston merely built faster than ever. During World War I it became an important military center and was the tragic scene of a race riot after which thirteen Negro (Continued on Page 58) to industry from Carboloy Cemented Carbide, the miracle metal of amazing long life. Hard dies to please "die-hards" BREAKING records for long life in the metal stamping field is an everyday feat with the hardest metal made by man — Carboloy Cemented Carbide. Take electric motor laminations like those above, for instance. On jobs of this nature, Carboloy punches and dies produce up to 2 million pieces between grinds-40 times more than dies previously used—enough to convince even the most "die-hard," cost-conscious production executive. Industry's greatest cost-cutter Carboloy often outwears common metals by as much as 100 times or more on tough die jobs. In sheet metal blanking and forming dies, cutting tools, or in wear-proofing machine parts, Carboloy is the greatest single cost-cutting factor modern industry has known. Here's Why: 1.Carboloy commonly triples the output of both men and machines. 2. It regularly increases the quality of products. 3. It cuts, forms or draws the toughest, most abrasive modern alloys with accuracy and speed previously unknown. Think what these important advantages can do for you today! Accept this challenge! It's JO to 1 there is a place for Carboloy in your plant. Let our engineers show how you can put this amazing metal to work profitably in your business. Carboloy Company, Inc., Detroit 32, Mich. 1347 C. ROOLOY CO. CARBOLOY CEMENTED CARBIDE THE HARDEST METAL MADE BY MAN


1947_11_29--022-Houston
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