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1947_11_29--022-Houston

III THE SATURDAY EVENING POST November 29,1947 Olt • 2 a an ee stimated t e symphony's CLE.R4Nce 14 Cl.. IRE SATURDAY EVENING POST r, 01 3 _1_ A 1 even when you're all on edge... \ // 1. Nervous? Fidgety? The cool, calm, competent touch of a Gem Razor works wonders! Finds your one best shaving angle instantly ... automatically! note reinforced back 1401E_• 3. Blade changing's a cinch, too! Twist, Gem opens! Twist, it closes! Use Gem Singledge Blades, or ... Gttl‘ OS° • nS1 vi %SI 2. Simply shave with Gem's 'Guiding Eye' flat against your face. Blade automatically 'sets' for quickest, cleanest, most comfortable shaves. 4. Gem 2-Edge Reversibles with 2— yes, two—keen, clean numbered edges! Either style 5 for 250. REMEMBER: Gem must give you the quickest, cleanest, most comfortable shaves you ever had–or MONEY BACK! AVOID 5 O'CLOCK SHADOW WITH GEM Gem Div., American Safety Razor Corp., Brooklyn t, N. Y. (Price adjusted in Canada) (Continued from Page 58) junction with Baylor University's Medical School, the University of Texas' College of Dentistry and School of Public Health, the Navy, the Veterans Administration, the M. D. Andelson Hospital for Cancer Research, and various other hospitals and research organizations, is now in process of building a $100,000,000 medical center. As one citizen pointed out, "Just like the Mayos' . . . only on a larger scale." This center will cover much of pretty Hermann Park, and will be a show place that will rival Houston's beautiful residential additions. There is an old Texas saying that Dallas people blow their money on clothes, while Houston folk spend theirs on houses. To ride through such Houston sections as River Oaks, Southampton, Riverside Terrace, Braeswood, Post Oak Road, Memorial Drive and others can only make you pause to wonder where so many thousands of families got $50,000 and up to plunk down for shelter. The natural growth of pine, yaupon, cottonwood, sycamore, oak, swamp hickory and magnolia trees along meandering bayous has given Houston's architects some splendid opportunities. Although there are many handsome Southern colonial mansions, some of the most attractive homes being built in Houston these days convey the spirit of the Texas Republic, when most houses had a "dog trot "—a completely open central hallway through which the south breeze or a man's hunting dogs might pass without let. Almost everybody in town seems to like to raise flowers, and when you leave the wealthier districts, you find that the poinsettia and oleander are the poor man's azalea and camellia, and water hyacinths tend to cram each drainage ditch with pale lavender loveliness. And just as springtime finds wistaria, cape jasmine and wild honeysuckle breaking into flower, so are some of the little green buds of Hous- ton's artistic life turning into modest foliage. All of Houston's newspapers, the Scripps-Howard Press, Jesse Jones's Chronicle and the Post—which is published and edited by ex-Gov. Will Hobby and his wife, ex-Director of the WAC Oveta Culp Hobby—support their home town's cultural strivings. But the individual Houstonian who fights hardest for the triumph of the symphony over the juke box, the living theater over twirly-girly shows, the ballet over the bump, and the art museum over the comic book, is lanky, evangelical Hubert Roussel. His column of criticism in the Post is the battle flag of all those who'd like to see the arts flourish in Houston right along with quarter-horse racing, ice hockey, the development of such famous local golfers as Jimmy Demaret, and some of the best duck hunting in America. "There is," Roussel said recently, "a vast cultural urge that is constantly gaining compression beneath the overburden of Houston's spectacular commercial development. A city or a person goes just so far in the urge to develop physically. Thedwhen you get the temple built, you realize that there is nothing going on inside the walls. Houston is not yet an art center, but the foundations are laid and the ferment is working. Its art, as yet undeterminable, will almost certainly be something indigenous, neither Western nor Eastern, but very real." Houston already has a very nice small art museum and a good, if not spectacular, symphony whose star is rising. It has such potent well-wishers as Miss Ima Hogg, daughter of one of Texas' most puissant governors, and Hugh Roy Cullen, who recently established the Cullen Foundation for education and public welfare. To get it started, he pitched in some oil proper- had T ti1e680w,O0h0ie,h0O0h.a hough the d vvaa lue f audiences are growing, and though Houston's Little Theatre has scored


1947_11_29--022-Houston
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