Page 7

1947_11_29--022-Houston

a 2:2 inch jet points down into your pipe jet®BIEGAHT IIE R • Guaranteed jet-action • Nothing mechanical to get out of order • All models designed with slip covers for easy fueling HEAVY NICKEL PLATE $5 NO FED. MOROCCO or PIGSKIN $6.501 TAX Heavy Gold Plate $15 Plus 20% Solid Sterling Silver $30 Fed. Tax See your dealer or write BEATTIE JET LIGHTER DISTRIBUTORS 17 East 48th St., New York 17, N. Y. .01111,1; —.0111n10` _4_0..0o1/r - - pegs lvoi, 04‘• pe.N\\ 000, 1kOk k McA'a ° lustrous and colorful ...a wonderful value! At Chain, Stationery, Gift and Department Stores. Sunday drivers — beware! Toby's auto paint job is a road-stealer froin start to finish. Easy to paint a car with Hudson's .Spirdiray Lektrik Paint Gun. Easy does it, too, on page 80. THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 61 Smart Olt WEAREVER PACEMAKER SET $4.25 * PEN ALONE *2.75* • 12 Karat Gold Filled Cap • 14 Karat Solid Gold Point • Exquisite Modern Design • Superb Craftsmanship Another Outstanding Value by AMERICA'S LARGEST FOUNTAIN PEN MANUFACTURER Other Sets *1.75 and 82.75 At leading chain, drug, department and stationery stores WEAREVER Pacemaker *Plus Fed. 'fax 0 1947 David Kahn, Inc. noteworthy successes, Houston is, nevertheless, still a businessman's town, and the businessman who has probably had the most fun out of it is Building Contractor Oscar F. Holcombe, who not only is mayor' at the moment but has held that office, off and on, for most of the past twenty-five years. Holcombe, with black eyebrows and brilliant white hair, a bold sense of showmanship and a Grade-A bedside manner, fits the part to a thousandth of an inch. He first was elected mayor in 1921, when Houston was little more than a third its present size. At the time, Houston was a rip-roaring Ku Klux center. Holcombe opposed the Klan, which, in turn, started a slander campaign about his drinking and gambling that was gaining credence and making his defeat a foregone conclusion. Just before the election, Holcombe arranged to be tried by fourteen ministers, nine of whom were said to be Klansmen. At the eleventh hour he was acquitted. The ministers went forth to proclaim the wrong that had been done him, the Chronicle and the Post rushed out extras, and you can guess who won the election. Eight years later he suffered his first defeat only when an opponent promised to collect garbage at the back door instead of the front. When he came back into office in 1933, the city was busted, firemen and policemen unpaid, and street and public-building lights were cut off. But Holcombe had rallied the banks behind him. Immediately after taking the oath of office in the Houston auditorium, he dramatically pulled a master switch that turned the lights back on. That same day every policeman and fireman got his pay. Today, just as there are few important crags on Houston's skyline not built by Jesse Jones, so there are virtually no major streets not built by Holcombe. The new City Hall, built "DIRTIEST DUTY IN THE COAST GUARD" (Continued from Page 36) is just an arbitrarily designated ten miles square of ocean that someone has marked out on a map. Ships loaded with meteorologists and meteorological equipment go into position on these stations and, come high wind or high water, they hang on. This deep-sea weather work is something which sprang up in a big way during the war and shrank to almost nothing with peace. Now it is reviving under the joint auspices of the United States and eight other countries. The service is as important to the transatlantic airlines as coastal beacons are to seagoing traffic. The weather ships also make themselves exceedingly useful as radio-relay stations, and in other watery lines of work. Most important of all is their air-sea-rescue activity. They are equipped with every facility for plane-guard work, including radio beacons on which a disabled plane may "home," and high-frequency direction finders that can locate a plane which falls into the sea. In a disillusioning postwar era this is one plan for international co-operation which is coming through. To find out more about it, Photographer Dave Robbins and I sailed out of Boston last June in the United States Coast Guard cutter Spencer, a sister during one of Holcombe's administrations, is one of the niftiest in the land. But the recent deal that pleases Holcombe most is the soon-to-be-built high-speed highway to Galveston, since Galveston is where Houston spends its summer week ends. There was an old interurban line between the cities that had long been obsolete and was losing money. The company wished to discontinue service, but before Holcombe agreed, the company had to surrender its right of way, which will be used for the Galveston Freeway, and pay $100,000 to the city to boot. Holcombe is a wealthy man with a big lumber company of his own. Besides, he is retained by Howard Hughes's Hughes Tool Company as its " Washington representative." Holcombe loves being mayor of one of the nation's fastest-materializing cities. "Other people like golf," he says. "I don't. I like this. Why, man, this is history unfolding fast. Who wouldn't be excited by having a direct hand in it? . . . Lawsy mercy! Now that you can build anything you are willing to pay for, people are going to be surprised. Houston's population is going to double again in the next ten years . . . and I'm being conservative when I say that. Other cities may have better weather, bigger orchestras, but what we've got more of than any other city is that old bedrock thing: opportunity." By driving for a quarter of an hour from the mayor's office, you can stand on the open prairie and see Houston fan out against the sky. Then, by listening carefully, you may catch the sound of what Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee heard as, in riding his horse across the Texas plains in 1857, he paused to listen to the almost cathedralesque silence. A companion asked him what it was he heard. Lee, rapt, said, "I am listening to the footsteps of the on- coming millions." THE END ship of the Bibb. The Spencer is one of six Coast Guard vessels the United States has pressed into service as floating weather bureaus, rotating them between Station UNMA (Abel) and Station Charlie. The Spencer was on its way to Station Able; Robbins and I were going along as far as the base at Argentia, Newfoundland. She was a 2600-ton cutter—about the size of a large yacht—and looked very yachtlike in her peacetime white. However, a huge radar grid turned slowly atop her foremast, and there were whirling white anemometers on her foreyard. Last February the Spencer was on Station Able, an angry patch of water between Greenland and Iceland. One rough day a wave that looked as if it had started rolling at the North Pole and kept snowballing ever since hit her bow on. It tore a steel plate off the forward turret and hurled it over the rail. A small mountain of green water thudded against the windows of the bridge. Capt. W. P. Hawley hung on by one hand and shoved the engineroom telegraph over to Dead Slow. As the cutter's bow staggered up from under tons of water, he observed, "It seems to be getting a little rough." It certainly was rough! During her three weeks' stretch on Able, the Spencer took more casualties than in the duel she fought—and won—with a U-boat while on wartime convoy duty. Broken limbs and smashed hands became commonplace. Nearly everyone •


1947_11_29--022-Houston
To see the actual publication please follow the link above