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1940_02_03--27_How_to_raise_a_child_part_iii

38 FOR CUTS u",,,.,,I1,,. I. th_ .nllseplic ,hat's a bu,." r~",t'dJ-the burn remedy thai's an Im/iut/ie! II g i" es olle·/wot h,.lft' relief in the modern manner: •. " 1;..,.,./". · ,.. r a h ydrHI,. ••• 1I. ltla , ,,. ' eetlo .. Wilholu stinHing or it~ining Ihe skin. a . II I ...... th''' ••• ,. •• ,lta tlci q uicklrhclps rel.ieve the pain or an injury. S. n . ,.,.. '" come.ct, and promotes healing, usually withOUI a scar. B . Ma.a,,,' 8 . Pr. ,.. r • • 11 AI ... ,. kup • cube of IOOIh'''1I IlIIinp!ic Un ... cncioa In ,h. kitchen, ;ntell.,lly r tldy t ..... cull or b ... ns •••• nOlht. in che cool compar,m.'" or 10'" Clr •.. and .11 d l.;mpOnlolchi,d '"M-''' u. .~.iull ;'r . .. in ,h. r • ..,i., medid ... nbinft. T"IH j()f. Jur $1. THE SRTURDRY EVEN/NO POST f}{f(})W "J{(}) lRt1llI~lE ./J!l Cf}{fIIILlJ)) The technician s:dd: " No human in terest. " ' here's the love iuwro"t?" It. WIIS luminously self-evident. that. the plot wa:! short of love interCl!t. The oilly aetion ..... n:! thut the armor-plated f:\uperdevils from tht) red phUlct exterminated an but three or four earth inhubiumts and then died of colds in tho heud. because the armor, though protecting them against machine gUllii and cannons, didn·t. keel) out. germs. The routine method or introducing the boymeets girl angle would be to cause ),'Ir. America to murry the Queen of ~ I ars nnd spend tho hOlley moon 011 Vcnu~, but Welles hilS too much artistic conscience tor such n. compromise. I-Ie ugreed " 'ith the techniciall , however, that the pieoe WB$ dun. AJbert Schneider, business manager for Welles, predicted that. the young maestro would hurt the prestige of his Mercury Theater and of the Columbia Broadcasting System by putting such insi pidities 011 the air; Schneider luter showed the courage of his convictions by going to sleep during the SUlidaynight broadcas t. Welles was gloomy about it all. lI ad time permitted, he would probably have discllrded the Martian invusion in ravor or something lively . While revising the script., it 0ccurred to him t.hut. the broadctult would lake Illaee on the night. beforo Halloween. Seizing on this as a pretext. to excuse the M artiUD hocus-pocus, he wrote nn epilogue SAying that the broudcast was the 1\ !ercury Theater's way of " dressing up ill a sheet. and jumping out the window UJld saying 'Doo."· 'I'he question whether Welles intended to scare people may eventuaJly be decided by juries. I. ..'.\ wsuit-s have been flied by persons who cluim to have boon hurt. during the Martian reign of terror. The strongest. part. or the defcnse is that. the brondcllSt was announced ill the radio columns of newspapers as n. dramatization or lhe H. O. WelllJ novel lind tlun, this was explained at the be.ginning, in the middle and at. the end of the performance. CharU. McCarthy', Dual Rot. The dial-twiddling habit was ~ sponsiblo for most of the trouble. 'I'he majority or listeners tuned in Inte nnd missed the announcement that. the broadcast was fiction. Charlie ,McCarthy was both the hero aud the villuin. By his nenr monopoly of the nir at this hour, he IIllved tens or millions trom the Welles rrightrulness. He is tbe vilJain, however, becnuse he held the dial twiddlers with his wisoomcks until aJ'ter the rivll l net.work hlld introduced the 1\1 arl ian invasion as an 1-1 . O. Wetis fantasy; t hen, yielding the microphone to flingers, Charlie released the dial twiddlors to tune in on the eyewitness picture of world destruction without having advance notice thnt it all came under the head or entertainment. Aceording to the Gallup poll. 9,000.- 000 people heard aU or part. of the Martian broadcast; according to the estimate of the Princeton sociologist«. approximately 1.750.000 J>OO llle were frightened. At allY rate, while Welles was grinding away at what. he apparently considered un intolerably dull routino. strange thing, were happening uround the country, samples of which are as follows: Public-spirited citizens of Provideuce, Rhode Island, teJel)honed to the local utility demanding a blackout. A Pillsburgh woman tried to drink poison, &lyillg, .. I'd ru.ther die this wny than like that." A linotyper of Selma. Louisiallu, running in Iho dark. caught his chin under 1\ neighbor's clothesline and thought he was hit by n. de:\th ray. A 1\lobile womUlI, b.-ett ing the news on returning from the Greilter Mobile GuJr Coast ~'uir, SAid to her husbund, .' I had n. premonition that we should have gone to church in!>tead of the fair." A colored woman, later interviewed by tho Princeton sociologists. recalled that. there was half 1\ chicken left in tho icebox. und said." We might as well ellt it now. because we won't be here in the morning." The st atT or the :\ Iemphis Press-Scimitar rushed to the office to get out an extm. Misled by neon lights in the distance nnd by the 'gasoline-uncl-rubber fumes on the highways. many rililidents of New J ersey claimed to II/wo seen lind smelled .the l\ lartians, who were su pposed to have landed Ilear Princeton. A man ran into the Press Club lit Princeton University SAying that he had seen the l\'lnrtian space ship explode and had observed animals jumping from it. The town of Concrete, Washington, got n. double dose of terror, as the local J)Ower-undlight 1)ll\nt. broke down just. Ill! Orson Welles was snying that the I>oisoll gas was choking him. Amollg those inten'iewoo for the Princeton treatise on mass psychology was a womnll who refused to be reIlSSUred by her husblllld. When he demonstmtcd tlmt. jazz bands were broudcl\sting from other stutioIl8, 'slu.' retorted, " Nero fiddled while Rome was bunling." A J e""ish woman who had previously come to reel that aU catastrollhcs were aimed at the Jews, told the scientific workers lhnt she hud felt a sense of relief on learning that the Martinns wero mowing down their victims without. rcgard to mceor crood. Oue womlln rej>orted thut through the blackest. moments she kept. saying to herself, " Well , IInyway, I won't. have to pay the butcher bilL" A Oerrnl\ll family, picking up a few things and starting to rUII. bad its plans disorgauized whell one of the children rtln baek into tho house to rescue l~ CIUUlry. A working girl, who l\ltd Sl.lved ti ll $3.25 toward a pair or shoes, s l~lIt it on a. railroad ticket IHld tr.l veled sixty miles before she leamed that. it wall only an Orson Welles holiday. The leMt. fright.ened listener WI\S 1\11"8. H. V. Knltenbom, who knew, she said. that if anything big were really hapj~lling, her husbuJld would be on the uir interpreting it.. After \\' elles hlld st.·uted the stampede, VII-riOIlS factors hell>ed it along. Mobs love panics. Persolls que8tiolled in the scientific survey confessed that they " derived 1\ certain SRtisfaction or pleasure" from their terror. Another factor was the news-bearer instinc t. A professional nobody enjoys the momentary illusion or being n somebody when he is fir st with the news. I-Iardcued nonentities never had such a chance of gaining temporary importance aa ill spreading the tidings that lhe world was coming to EUI end. Some commentntors thought that Well es hud merely exploded lalent hysteria over the European fJituation. Republican philosophers foulld that. the pa:.!d resulted from national jitters cau by the epileptic policies of the Kew Deal. A psychoanalyst, who gave his views to • PrilL(.'eton inquirers, laid tho blame 011 sex im broglio.'!. Qlle ulliversi.ty &>eiologist Slid the explanation wus that. all the intell igcnt j)(JOplo of the country were li stening to Clm.rlie 1\}cClirthy. Hitler nnd tho Nazi pre;;s tmced the uproar to the naIve contcnts of the Amcrictl.n mind. Orson Welles has a proround theory. The most terrifying thing, he says, is suddenly becoming aware lI,at. you arc not alone. In this cuse, the earth. thinking itselr alone. suddcnly became aware that Ilnother planet WJlS prowling Mound . Well es hus another theorY lIamely, that the lust two generations lire softened up becnuse they were deprived in their childhood, through mistnken theories of educa tion, of the tales of blood and horror which used to be a purt.or the routine trninillg of the young. Under the old system, according to Welles. the child fe lt. at home nmong ghosts and goblins. a nd did not grow up to be It pllsh-over for sens:nionlll canards. tiut the ban 011 gruesome fa iry u\les. terrifying nursemaids and other standard sources of horror hus lett. most. of the I>opuiatioll without :IllY protection nguinst fee-fifo rum stu IT. The First Citizen o f Mars Welles hud nearly fini shed tho broad cast I~ rore ho detected thut something was wrong. Through n glass lllrtition in the studio he observed tho elltrnnce of severnl 1>oIicemen, nnd he ll iso noticed ull wonted activit.y I\t a bllt.tery of telephones. As soon as t.he broadClUlt. was ovm', 8ttendiUlis hurried over LO inform him that there were long-distance calls for him. . The first. message " ' IlS Il threat or del\th from a chamber-ot-commeree official or ~'li llt , Michigun. who asserted that the J>opuintioli of ~'lint hnd been scn\,\A.lred fa r and wide und that it. would u\ke dnys to reassemble it. The next mCS!>llge gnve statis tics on the broken tibias and fibulus of Westen! PennsylvJlnia. Hundreds or dollars were paid LO the A. 1'. & T. that night for the privileb"6 of swearing at Welles. One tclellhoncr cnlled Well es, .. YOII beauty," but. nOllo or the others I>nrn.phrased the clnim that. he WIlS born out. of wedlock. The thing grew serious as thedeuth toll mounted. Itw8snro\lnd twenty at ten 1'.M.Later research indicated that there had boon 1I0fil talities, but at the timo \\'elles re,,'l.lroed himseU liS n mnss murderer. Bll t whether n. wholeSllle killer or not. he hnd to get to the Mercury Thellter to direct a dress rcheursal orTheShoomnker's llolidllY. 'I'ho inrRllt prodigy hRS always had the ability to abolish instantly all subjects except the one he is COllceDtr. lting 011. For three or four hours, while he wns drilling his CRSt.. he was unconscious or everything else; 011 ",'alk ing out to take a smoke, ho was surprised to see his llIune in bright. lights racing Rround the bulletin board which girdles The New York Times Building. Welles mentioned this 011 returning to the thealer : somebody said he was crazy. Re sighed and continued "\\'ith the rehearsal. which wellt on until three or four ..... M. 'rhe no,'(t dn.y he apologized Rnd explninod nil day long. The chief victim of the panic is Welles himselt. He is bmnded tor life as the Mars mnll. People beardowlJ on (c ... " ..... ., 0 .. Po •• 40)


1940_02_03--27_How_to_raise_a_child_part_iii
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