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THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 23 Alb./ LE M417.M. HERBERT JOHNSON'S CARTOON SWORD OF DAMOCLES—MACHINE AGE SHANGHAI. HAVING kicked John Bull around until the seat of his pants is full of patches, having fought the Russian Bear until serious wounds need a lot of licking, Japan now seems to have decided to pick on Uncle Sam for a while. Americans living in the Far East have long foreseen such a development. Three events of the summer of this year made it inevitable. First, there was Washington's abrupt abrogation of the 1911 trade treaty with Japan. Second, there was Washington's curt announcement that the American Government would tolerate no unilateral establishment of a "New Order in East Asia." Third, there was the outbreak of war in Europe. The abrogation of the trade treaty has scared and angered Japan. She fears being cut off from her main sources for essential war supplies, and is dumfounded at the threat of having to lose her best market for her major export, silk. American opposition to Japan's grandiose plans for a New Order in East Asia implies serious and determined efforts to block her dream of dominating China. The war in Europe means sharp curtailment of Japan's European trade, automatically terminates her imports of war necessities from Europe, and leaves the United States in the position of being the only country in the world which could—if it wouldgive Japan credit. Credit the Japanese Empire must have, if it is to carry out the development and rehabilitation of China, but credit will not be forthcoming from American sources as long as the American Government so thoroughly disapproves of Japan's actions on the Asiatic mainland. Inauguration of Japan's new anti- American policy dates from mid- September, and coincides with the landing at Yokohama of Mr. Yakichiro Suma, for about two years counselor of the Japanese embassy in Washington. Oriental Home Truths FOR two days after he landed, Mr. Suma was busy giving sensational interviews to Japanese newspapers. He said that the people of Japan do not realize how hostile the American people feel toward them, that the prevailing toast of younger officers of the American Navy is "Remember the Panay," that the war in China had deprived many missionaries of employment, and that these missionaries had "instigated the women of America and influenced public opinion." The returning diplomat told the Japanese public that the feeling of the American Navy toward Japan is "unusually bad." He declared that the abrogation of the trade treaty was "as a bolt out of the blue, or a surprise hit in a baseball game." Mr. Suma is important, really a personage. I have known him for a dozen years, since he was the slender and rather retiring official spokesman of the Japanese legation in Peking. Today he is no longer Iffly HALLETT' ABEND slender. Good living and an antipathy to exercise have given him a rotundity akin to that of the monks popular in cast bronze in Japan. He seems to be a combination of several men. As a host, he is incomparable. His dinners were for years the envy of.the diplomatic corps in China. As a rule, he does not drink, but the wines and brandies he serves to his guests are marvelous. In a morning coat he does not appear to advantage, but in a heavy, dark-hued silk kimono, befitting his rank and wealth, he is an arresting figure. He can be shrewd and cold, or warm and hearty. His knowledge of the inside of Chinese politics and intrigue is probably equaled only by that of the famous General Doihara, misnamed the "Lawrence of Manchuria." He can voice a one-sentence opinion that cuts like a lash from a frozen whip. Mr. Suma is also an art connoisseur and a wit. His ruling on the authenticity of a Chinese porcelain is final, and his private collection of Chinese art is the most valuable in the Japanese Empire. He hails from far Northern Japan, where the dialect is vastly different from the spoken language of Tokyo, and was nearly cashiered from the diplomatic service at his first examination because of "impertinence." One question was: " What foreign language did you learn first?" His answer was: "Tokyo Japanese." When I saw him in (Continued on Page 37)


Japan_Picks_on_Uncle_Sam
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