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THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 37 MUSTARD WITH HORSERADISH Gives new "punch" to the flavor of HAM! In fact, serve Best Foods Mustardwith Horseradish wherever you formerly used ordinary mustard. See how much more zip it has! Inexpensive, too! Good food stores everywhere now carry this exciting new kind of mustard. (Continued from Page 35) Don't ever associate a human figure with spirits in advertising. Leave the pink-checked, well-groomed model to the magazine editor to illustrate his fiction. To couple him with whisky is a deceitful implication. To help to spread this philosophy Mr. Tunney took his company into the Distilled Spirits Institute, a publicrelations organization of the country's leading distillers. Then, disgusted, he took it out again. "I have become convinced," he said, "that no help or co-operation toward self-discipline can be expected from the institute." Not all of Mr. Tunney's widely publicized and, by some of his distilling colleagues, resented remarks, fell upon stony ground. In the fall of 1938, the Distilled Spirits Institute made a more than passing gesture toward the Tunney program. It hired, as its executive director, Dr. Wesley A. Sturges, a Methodist minister's son of impeccable reputation, who, for fifteen years, had been the Sterling Professor of Law at Yale University. The powers which he found available at the institute were only advisory. He aims to make them more binding and—with at least as much authority as Mr. Will Hays, in the motion-picture industry—to impose a code upon the business and enforce it. Doctor Sturges' point of view is close to that of Mr. Tunney. His now pending program calls for a close supervision of advertising; for a continual check-up on all selling practices; for a closer supervision of retail establishments. Except on the side of better enforcement, he eschews politics and aims to persuade the industry to do the same. In Pennsylvania, he had a hand in the selection of a law professor from Dickinson College, a Methodist school, as head of the state liquor board; in Ohio, his successful candidate was a professor at an Ohio university. His field men work with the law-enforcement authorities. They tip off the state's agents as to where and what to look for in the way of lawbreaking among retailers. In several states he has helped to clarify and tighten the enforcement code. But his most important immediate objective is the organization of citizens' Washington last June, he laughingly admitted he missed the curio markets of the Far East, and that the only interesting curios he could find in Washington were certain members of Congress. " But then," he amended quickly, "in Japan we have our Diet, too, you know." This is the man who started the wave of anti-Americanism in the Japanese press. Why? Because he is an important "army man," rated acehigh with the most militant elements in Japan. The important role for which the army has cast Mr. Suma was indicated shortly after his arrival at home. He was named head of the Bureau of Information of the Tokyo government, and also official spokesman of the Foreign Office. Even before Mr. Suma took this post, Japan embarked on its anti- Americanism cycle. The day after Mr. Suma landed in Japan, the powerful. committees to aid enforcement. Such a committee is already functioning, as a test case, in Connecticut. The Connecticut committee consists of more than 1000 representative citizens, from every county. Its purposes are to cooperate with the liquor Control Commission in law enforcement; to investigate the qualifications of those who apply for licenses; to aid in the prosecution of lawbreakers; to seek the constant improvement of the state's liquor laws and to co-operate with the industry "in establishing such practices as will best serve the social and economic welfare of this state." Part of the funds for the committee's work are provided by the institute; the rest are raised locally. Since its organization, the committee has gathered evidence which brought about the revocation of some twenty licenses; it has prepared legislation against the licensing of aliens and, in a large number of the state's smaller communities, has helped to tighten enforcement of the laws against selling to minors, to drunkards and to persons on relief. Doctor Sturges, despite his Methodist upbringing, believes that, with such committees functioning in most of the problem states, the drive behind the new dry movement will be finally removed. A somewhat similar wave of housecleaning has swept through the brewing industry. The United Brewers Industrial Foundation serves the brewers of the country very much as the Distilled Spirits Institute serves the distillers. Its service in the first postrepeal years was largely devoted to an effort to dissociate beer from liquor and to establish it as a "food" beverage. The beer propagandists of that era went so far as to publish a cookbook, It's Smart to Serve Beer—Menus and Recipes to Assist the Gracious Hostess. The recipes included Beer Soup with Milk, Beer Bread, Vegetable Salad and Beer Jelly and, to cap the more or less delectable climax, Chocolate Beer Cake. The results served chiefly to furnish material for the drys. More recently, the foundation has hired a new staff of public-relations experts and launched a new program which, because it was first worked in that state, is sometimes called the Nebraska Plan. This, like the plan of (Continued from Page 23) Hochi Shimbun, mouthpiece of the "younger officer" group in the Japanese army, took occasion to warn the United States editorially that " the Pacific will be turned into a theater of battle" unless America quickly "amends its attitude toward Japan." Not only the rigidly controlled Japanese newspapers joined in a unanimous and apparently inspired assault upon the United States. On September twenty-second, an unnamed official spokesman declared that under normal conditions Japan and Great Britain would benefit most under the cashand carry plan, adding that the American Government may, however, undertake to apply moral pressure against Japan after the expiration of the trade treaty next January. The same source then stated that if America takes such steps, assuming " the self-imposed role of watchdog of the Orient," then the "relations between the United States and Japan Doctor Sturges, is directed toward self-regulation. In Nebraska the leading brewers and distributors organized the Brewers and Beer Distributors Committee. The committee employed Charles E. Sandall, a former United States district attorney, to direct its work. Acting on behalf of the industry, Sandall's organization, in the year and a half of its operation, has investigated over 500 retail establishments. Many of them were brought into line by a warning. In fifty-two cases requests were made for legal action against the establishments. In addition to this pressure on places where beer is sold, the Nebraska committee has moved to end "tied houses "—in which the brewers secured a financial hold on retail establishments— has helped to keep the industry out of politics and has supported the state's liquor authorities. Such committees, under unusually competent leadership, are now functioning in eight states. The public, and particularly the newspaper, approval of this program has been of such proportions that the brewers, like the dis tillers, are convinced that they have found the answer. What effect these developments will have on the progress of the new dry movement cannot yet be predicted. The effect on the drys is less than zero. They hail the new tactics of the industry as proof of the essentially outlaw character of the commodity they are fighting. On a long-time basis, they have no interest in moderation and very little in law enforcement. The one leads to drunkenness; the other legalizes the process. That either the business or the product can be made respectable enough to merit the right to survive is rejected as both a moral and a social impossibility. If that sounds out of step with the times, the drys turn, for reassurance, to the vast numbers of Americans, young and old, who are separated by a wide and very yawning gulf from the White Lights and all associated worldliness. If it is stiff-necked, they take heart in the belief that it is stiffneckedness of the sort with which the successful makers-over of men have always been blessed. If success in this instance looks remote, they deny that there is any need to hurry. They claim resources of a kind that makes a long war possible. are bound to become worse. In any event, the Japanese must be prepared to face any situation which may arise." The famous Hochi Shimbun then sounded this ominous warning: "Neither Japan nor the United States wants war, but it is easily imaginable that Japan may be compelled to safeguard her right to existence. It is also possible that a war crisis will arise between the two countries in case the United States persists in its oppression of Japan, who, however, will never swerve from her devotion to the cause of the construction of a New Order in East Asia." The influential Asahi and the Yomitui printed almost identical editorials, declaring it evident that America intends to "succeed Britain as the watchdog in the Far East." Then the Tokyo Nichi Nichi interpreted as hostile toward Japan the transfer to Manila of the U. S. aircraft carrier Langley, the dispatch of new 4/014/ DELICIOUS FRENCH DRESSING WITHOUT FUSS OR BOTHER! Smart hostesses are serving this real French Dressing made with "Fresh-Press" Salad Oil. It tastes fresher than home-made! 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