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38 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST November 25,1939 HERE'S HOW THOUSANDS OF BUSINESS MEN GET EXTRA HELP FOR A FEW CENTS A DAY! • OF COURSE he's rushed these days. The new men are slow getting into the swing. Rush orders pile up. Shipments get delayed. Time is wasted on follow-ups and explanations. He's bogged down in detail. His desk looks like a junk heap. ROSINESS FORMS WHAT'S THE REASON? He works hard enough. But his office just isn't organized to take emergency work in stride. There -are too many slip-ups . . . too many verbal instructions. He could soon plug those loop-holes if he would put more of his ideas on paper—in a form that tells what is to be done, who is to do it and when it is to be finished. 4 7 A, ---p MORE SATES HERE'S THE HELP YOU NEED TO HANDLE EMERGENCY WORK Send for new booklet, " 21 Ways to Keep a Clear Desk," and Working Kit of Hammermill Bond. This material outlines practical ways to organize work with paper and printing. Shows how printed forms keep jobs moving, fix responsibility, clear away details ... how a color signal system speeds work, cuts errors . . . how up-to-date stationery builds sales. WHAT WI LL IT COST ? 25 up-to-date forms or letterheads on Hammermill Bond cost only 10 more than on cheap, unknown paper. That means you can have Hammermill Bond for only 30 a day extra per stenographer. See how simply, economically you can streamline your entire organization. Send for "21 Ways" and Working Kit of Hammermill Bond. Hammermill Paper Company, Erie, Pa. Please send me, free, "21 Ways to Keep a Clear Desk" and the 1939 Working Kit of Hammermill Bond. (Students and outside U. S. 504) Name Position (Please attach to your business letterhead) sEY-1 1 -25 IT IS HAMMERMILL'S WORD OF HONOR TO THE PUBLIC submarines to take the place of outdated craft in the American Asiatic Fleet, the flight of more than a dozen heavy bombers from San Diego to Manila, the advancing of the date for naval maneuvers in the Pacific, the proposal to broaden the Panama Canal, and the decision to begin work immediately upon air bases in Alaska, Hawaii and at Midway and Johnston islands. There is no freedom of the press in Japan. If there were, the foregoing quotations might be dismissed as having been culled from irresponsible newspapers. But the Japanese press never embarks upon campaigns of this kind without official inspiration. The result of all this is that Uncle Sam is now regarded by the Japanese public as the big bad man of the world. No mention is made of the two years of American official patience and-forbearance during which there were more than 600 flagrant violations of American rights and properties in China. The Japanese publie has no knowledge of the fact that more than 600 American protests are on file in Tokyo, and that few of these cases have been adjusted. The list grows longer every week. There are several important reasons for this new policy of hostility. In the first place, it is essential to have some third power always under attack, to have some nation supposedly playing the role of wicked helper to Chiang Kai-shek. The China hostilities, instead of resulting in a brilliant victory for Japan within three or four months—as the Japanese military and the Japanese -public expected—had already dragged on for nearly twentyseven months when this anti-American campaign was launched. Japan has thrown her full military strength into China and has not been able to clinch a victory. Nor has she been able to make any profit from the venture. The expenditure of man power and of money goes on and on, and seems destined to continue indefinitely. Nippon Loses Face Japan cannot accept blame for this failure—some other power must be made a villain for the piece. England was first chosen for this role, because England was trapped and could not act in the Far East so long as European peace was in the balance. Besides, England had much in China that Japan coveted and wanted to grab. Soviet Russia was nominated for Villain No. 2, and the constant Manchurian- Siberian border clashes were justification enough. The Anti-Comintern Axis powers, Germany and Italy, were represented to Japan as the empire's true friends. America, until September, was regarded sorrowfully as a misguided nation which was anti-Japanese only because of "characteristically sentimental sympathy for the underdog, China." Then, between July twenty-sixth and September fourth, the face of the world was changed. On the former date the United States gave notice of intention to abrogate the trade treaty with Japan. On August twenty-fourth Germany wrecked the Anti-Comintern Axis by concluding the nonaggression pact with Soviet Russia. On September third England declared war. When the face of the world was changed, the face of Japan was lost. Germany slapped it. Obviously, Japan's foreign policy had been based upon woeful ignorance of forces at work in Europe. The dominant army group in Japan had counted upon an early outright military affiance with Germany, but Germany teamed up with Japan's implacable foe, Russia. Had the German-Japanese military alliance been concluded, the Far East would have been in turmoil the first week in September. There is no doubt that the Japanese navy would have attacked Hong Kong, and that British concessions in China and the International Settlement at Shanghai might have been taken over by force. But Japan had to watch and wait. Her leaders realized they must not take sides too soon. England and France might win the war. Russia, freed of the Guman menace on her western borders, might attack Japan, and Japan was weakened after more than two years of indecisive fighting in China. The New Bad Man What to do? First, Japan decided to announce a policy of nonintervention in the European struggle. The initial idea was to make peace with the democracies and to pick Germany for Enemy No. 1. The Japanese newspapers ,began a bitter campaign against Hitler, charging him with perfidy. Swastika flags disappeared' from the streets of Japanese cities. Japanese sentries at Tientsin stopped slapping Britishers and began slapping Germans instead. But then came the fear—Germany might win the war, Germany and Russia might fight together against England and France. So the anti-German movement collapsed. A hasty truce was patched up with Russia, ending hostilities on the Manchurian-Outer Mongolian border. Germany, who may still make some new agreement with the Japanese if it can be fashioned so as to benefit the Reich enough, was courteously received at the Foreign Office. But Japan still writhes from the blow of the German-Soviet pact. The hurt is not lessened by the fact that Japan's leaders have long known that German military observers have a low opinion of Japanese military prowess. German army experts in the Far East have openly sneered at Japan's inability to complete the annihilation of the Chiang Kai-shek armies, and have jeered at mistakes of Japanese strategy. The Japanese reply to these criticisms had long been: "You couldn't do any better yourselves." But now Germany has done better, much better. The rapid conquest of Poland made the Japanese militarists do a lot of serious thinking. For Poland, as compared to Germany, was initially much stronger than China as compared to Japan. But "dangerous thoughts" such as these must not circulate among the Japanese people. So America is now Japan's official bad man of the world. There are many reasons for Japan's nominating us for this distasteful role. With the European democracies fully engaged against Germany, the United States, for all practical purposes, will be left as the sole upholder of the Nine Power Treaty, as the only remaining obstacle to eventual Japanese domination of China. Premier Abe, who heads the new Japanese government, understands this very well. Just after the installs, tion of his new cabinet, on August thirtieth, General Abe announced that his government was willing.to make friends with those powers which understand and accept Japan's new position (Continued on Page 40)


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