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J-M Auto Clock Johns-Manville Shock Absorber J-M Tirenew J-M Narco Tire and Top Savers J-M Non-Blinding Lens J-M Automobile Tape J-M Dry Batteries J-M Fire Extinguisher "Noark" Enclosed Fuses G-P Muffler Cut-Out Write for Booklets ,2,,2) THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 29 One Firm One Service One Guarantee back of every J-M Automobile Accessory H.W.JOHNS- MANVILLE CO. 294 Madison Ave., NewYork 4 7 Branches and Service Stations in all large Cities oolizAmkr CTMI RETTV (Continued from Page 15) cowards nor women cowards nor cowardly children. Cowardice is a relative term, anyhow, but there can be no qualifying adjectives for the spirit which I saw displayed by the Belgians, the French, the English and the Germans, and in the scope of that statement I mean to include those of all ages and all conditions and all classes. If war brings out what is worst in human beings it brings out likewise what is best in them. For the moment I seem to have strayed from my theme, which was the relations existing between Private Johann Schmidt and the commissioned men above him. Getting back to it again, I would have you understand that though I myself witnessed no actual mistreatment of soldiers by officers, neither did I witness, except in certain rare and exceptional instances, any evidence of actual affection existing between them. They were knit together completely enough, but only by bonds of duty and of discipline, not by ties of personal association and mutual fondness; at least so I judged. I did notice that as the campaign advanced, and repulses and actual defeats succeeded the first astounding succession of successful advances into the enemy's country, the men and the officers drew closer together, becoming, as it were, mutually alive to the soldierly qualities of each other and one another. At the outset the officers, and especially the younger officers, had a habit of blaring their commands to their men in rasping roars. Some of the lieutenants seemed to think it incumbent upon them to scold and threaten the enlisted men at every opportunity; and always, as I took note then, an officer in his dealings with an individual soldier addressed him in the third person. "What does he want?" the officer would demand when the soldier came up and saluted, as though the soldier were acting as spokesman for some one else. By October, though, I saw a change. Company officers were using fatherlike diminutives in speaking of their men. Often enough I have heard a typical Prussian officer call his soldiers "My children," or single out an individual trooper as " My son." It made no difference that the officer was perhaps a fledgling of a lieutenant and the soldier a grizzled veteran of the Landsturm, old enough to be his father, the officer would call him "Son." It was as though a common partnership in the privations and the dangers and discomforts of war, a common sharing of the same hopes and the same disappointments and the same destinies, had brought the pair closer together, making each actually aware of the good qualities of the other. Yet for all that there was still the gulf between them; it remained unbridgeable for wideness and unplumbable for deepness. The officer lived and moved in his separate world, breathing his special and favored air; and the soldier abided in his humbler sphere and sought not to escape from it. There were times when they seemed almost to be comrades; there were times when they suggested creatures from different planets accidentally thrust into each other's company and engaged for the moment in working out the same laborious problem. In our earlier wanderings with the German columns across Belgium or behind them we made friends with the privates. We had mighty poor credentials then, and since at any moment any officer who was so minded might lock us up or turn us back, we preferred the company of the common soldiers, who practically without exception were friendly and kindly. They shared their rations with us and gave us freely what information they had. That it was usually misleading information was not their fault; they told us what they had heard. But on the third and last expedition to the battle front we had a captain of reserves in full uniform for our guide and traveling companion, and from the starting hour of that trip we noticed that his presence in our company kept our former friends at arm's length and more than arm's length. Unless expressly called upon to give it, no man below the rank of a lieutenant volunteered any advice or suggestion— except once and once only, and then the circumstances were extraordinary. We had left Brussels in our car, bound for the besiegements before Antwerp. This was four days before Antwerp fell and the bombardment was in full force. We skirted Extradited from Bohemia DOOR little letter! When Hoskins got it he set right out for New York City—as fast as he could go—and when he got there— But it's all told better by 0. HENRY in one more of his wonderful stories. 274 of them— about war and love and people—are yours at a little price if you send the coupon at once. A World Record Made O. Henry has made another record. stories since printing began. Will More volumes of his works have been tory of the world. Up to the day this page goes to press 1,200,000 volumes sold than any short stories in the his- you be left out of a thing as tremendous as this? Will you let this man with his power for laughter and tears take his treasure to others and not have been sold—in England and Aus- to you? 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" Gunga Din" reminds ythoeu b geestt, hfer ewe,r o6t eV—olKumipelisn ogf w Khiop lkinnge,w you of the deathless heroism of plain men in battle, and to know the war the British soldier as no one ever did correspondent you must read "The or will again. "Tommy Atkins" is Light that Failed." dying today in the trenches. "The Now is the time to read Kipling, Taking of Lungtungpen," when the because Kipling is the one above Brit ish soldiers in India fought naked all others who knows the soldier— as they were born, gives a who understands the lust of battle. 4"481' hint of what they may do And because he is master among today with a few clothes writers—his stories are world wide in on—and the " Drums of application. French or German, Austhe Fore and Aft " puts a trian or Hindu or British—these stolump in your throat as ries of war and love are true of all you hear echoes of other men regardless of nation or flag. 18 Volumes Vivid With Life 12Volumes of 0. Henry, 6 Volumes of Kipling. 169 Stories, 274 Stories— one long Poems and a long novel. Bound in novel, all bound in dark red cloth and gold tops, gold backs— green cloth, illustrated, six volumes crammed with excitegoldtop, goldbacks,I2 vol- ment and adventure and with #, tunes for man and woman the heat and color of India an,d :03u and child toreadandread the hidden fire of the English- 4, again—half price if you man — Free if you send the / s. E n send the coupon today. coupon today. REVIEW The Two Sets REV OF IEWS / 30 Irving Place Free On Approval Now York /Send me on approval. We pay all charges both ways. If you ,,, charges paid by you. 0. don't like the books send them back at I ,,,,H,ZY:,,Itkill'A1l.2,, siti; our expense. Otherwise 3 cents a day / 6-volume set of Kipling bound pays for them. , in cloth. If I keep the books. I will remit ii per month for 13 set only ,* Send the coupon today for the , month. for the 0. Henry Kipling, Free. 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