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Lewis - Nature, Inc

Hold Up That Arch A sagging arch is an ever present source of discomfort. The Coward arch support shoe holds the arch in place, supports weak ankles, and makes walking and standing a real pleasure. Caear d Shoe is built to give comfort and satisfaction. If you have any foot troubles you will eventually wear Coward Shoes. Now is a good time to start. For MEN, WOMEN and CHILDREN Sold Nowhere Else JAMES S. COWARD 264-274 Greenwich St. (near Warren St.), N. Y. Mail Orders Filled—Send for Catalog THE SATURDAY EVENING POST That O one ManCan Another May Henry Ford T I , HERE'S less difference between men than we think." And Henry Ford knows. At forty-five he was a poor man. Now he's the head of a corpo- ration that makes $25,000,000 a, year. Last year he made 326,000 automobiles— more than all the other companies in this country combined. The difference between men lies in knowing how to work—in knowing how to use your time—in what the world today calls "Efficiency." What Efficiency did for Henry Ford and his marvelous business, it can do for you—as an individual. Learn how through the Course in Personal Efficiency 24 Lessons—With Charts—Records—Diagrams—Condensed—Clear T ROUGH this course already 8000 men are on the way to get what they want in the quickest, shortest, easiest way. The Treasurer of the biggest bond house in the Northwest saves hours every day—an author in New York does twice as much work and has more time to sell that work—a State official saves his State $3000 on one job. • The Efficiency Movement has swept the world because it has brought to men who saw no way out a new light to success. Let the Emerson Course teach you to conserve your brains, your time—for these are your capital—just as money and machinery are the capital of a factory. Learn to invest them right. There's more coming to you out of life—get it. Get the money and rest and success you ought to have. You won't work longer—you'll work less. You are full of unused energy. Consider country people and city people. The rapidity of the city man's life bewilders the country man. A day in New York is a terror. But give him a year in the city and he will keep the pace as well as anyone. He will get ten times as much out of himself—and he won't be working any harder. That's what Efficiency will do for you who are already in the city. It will attune you to a new gait—a new zest and snap— and thine; will leap along where now they crawl. These principles are not casual ideas of Mr. Emerson's. They are the scientific principles he has developed in forty years of study. He has applied them in over 200 factories, railroads and other organizations. They are studied by other Efficiency Engineers in America, England, France, Germany and other countries who have learned them from Emerson. His big organization in NewYork (he has 40 assistants) has taught efficiency to steel mills and railroads, factories and publishers. I • FREE—THIS BOOK "Where's the Money Coming From?), Send for this book. It contains the answer to the ever-present ques-. tion of "Where's the money coming from?" Some of the chapters: • Name SE.P. 10- 2-15 • Review I1I 0of Reviews • • 30 Irving Placa New York 14 Chapters—in Colors—Illustrated What is EiRciancy? For Whom Is Efficiency? Work. You the Only Half Your Power, e' Send me particulars Are Too Ear-minded or Eye-minded? Find To What Do Some Men Owe Their Sun- I about your course in Out What You Are Actually Doing with Your cam? Health Culture. Personal Finances. E,1.1rcwienn.cayl.a..nI.l.Sutrobroyookf Tim*. Most Failures Are Due to Guess Mr. Emerson's M gg to You. The Study of Efficiency Takes Little Time—Gives You Much "Where's the Money Coming From?" This puts me under Time. Now— today —send this coupon. You can't have last p no obligation. week's minutes back—but you can still use next week's right. „.• Send this coupon now. The Review of Reviews Co. 30 Irving Place • New York Address • WOULD YOU show this standard high grade, fully visible typewriter to your friends and let them see wherein it excels any other $100 typewriter, if by doing this and rendering other small assistance, you could easily earn one to keep as your own ? Then by post card or letter to us simply say "Mail Particulars." WOODSTOCK TYPEWRITER CO., Rol 200, Woodstock, III. 12 New Bulbs, 10c Together with a Complete Treatise on the Culture of Hardy Bulbs both indoors and out, and our beautiful Catalogue — 1 Giant Calls, largest and finest. 2 Pink Freesia, exquisite new color. 3 Purity Freesia, big pure white. 3 Double Rosebud Oxalis, hu ge 33 3 half dollar, and tine as a Rose. 3 Oxalis G. Duchess, mixed coin.. All for 10 cts. postpaid. Our Catalogue of Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus, Lilies, Hardy Plants and rare winter-blooming plants free to au. John Lewis Childs. lac., Floral Park, N.Y. • • o Ordinary Plug "rio\ SU-DIG Plug • To / 14 mag. or battery (TWO SIMULTANF,IUS SPARKS EACH MINORS() system Gi:LEAT L-EAG-E Get full power and mileage from your gasoline I Avoid the waste of fuel due to sluggish burning. Eliminate needless advancing of the spark—make combustion quicker. Two Plugs, sparking simultaneously, burn the mixture very much faster than one plug does. With the flame starting from two points at once combustion is made complete and almost instantaneous. A wonderful increase in power, snap, and gasoline mileage results from installing one - SU-DIG SERIES PLUG per cylinder in connection with the regular plug. Carbon deposits are reduced, and leaner mixtures successfully burned. No change is needed in magneto or battery system. Tap the valve caps ' if necessary. Ask your dealer, or write for free book, " How to Get More Power." SUPERIOR MOTOR POWER COMPANY, 42 Irving Place, New York New Plan Saves Gara4eBuyers50% The Sterling System has entered the garagebuilding field. This means by far the lowest prices ever offered. Heretofore private garages have sold at around $80 and up. Now a better design costs but half I Anti this price includes new features which save all labor expense. NO WORKMEN NEEDED—BUILD IT YOURSELF IN 3 HOURS No professional workmen are needed to put up your Sterling Garage. Ninety-five percent of the work is done is OW milk. Each part comes measured, sawed, fitted and Plain!, marked. All you do is to soil them together. Positively. tools needed except a hammer (we furnish that free!). You can easily erect it yourself the same day or in two spare evenings— only three hours all told. NO EXTRAS TO BUY OUR PRICE INCLUDES EVERYTHING We not only cut and fit all parts, but furnish, in addition to the lumber, all Roofing, Hardware, Glass. Saab, Hinges, Nails. Locks and two Coats of Paint to match your building. AU for 844.50. The Sterling is a very handsome Garage, practical is every may—"dead easy" to put up—sold at a record-breaking price. We unqualifiedly guarantee safe, Prompt delivery and permanent satisfaction. WRITE PRICES Never before, in our win- 8 z 14 complete $44.50 ion. have such remarkable 8 z 18 complete $54.50 garage values been offered 10 z 20 complete $62.00 When you see the largepho- etc. tos, complete descriptions and prices shown in our new Folder we are confident you will agree. Address a card now for Folder. Don't buy or build until you get it. Write today. INTERNATIONAL MILL AND TIMBER CO. Dept. N-7, Bay City. Mich. CALIF. fs`t;ialCatrii.ceholnisety HONEY _me. Produced by our Calif. apiaries. Explains grades, sized packager, prepaid prices, our trial offer before payment. Sample for dime to pay postage. Address, SPENCER APIARIES CO., Ventura, Calif.; Charles City, Iowa; or Stockbridge, Mass. PATENTS WANTED Write for of Patent BBLuiyst- era and Inventions Wanted and $1,000,000 in prizes offered for inventions. Our four books sent Free. Patents secured or our Fee Returned. Victor .1. Evans & Co., 1 Ninth St., Washington, D. C. .HOTELETI 9 ENC. (Continued from Paso 12) time in all his pet ways of poisoning himself. He slept until nine and he had two cocktails for lunch, and the only exercise he took was lighting cigarettes. He wore yellow chamois gloves, and could not have been pushed into the vicinity of a cold bath by anything less powerful than a hydrostatic press. He delighted in all the aspects of business, from files to telephone calls. He managed to get so much pleasure out of worrying about office details which, from the distant Colony, had seemed negligible that his work was as much of a poison as his dissipations. But he no longer telephoned to ornate young ladies and he no longer ran races with himself to see how late he could stay up nights. He was always tenderly conscious of Beulah; eager to blunder out with her to concerts, picture exhibitions, lectures; considerably more eager to take her to the restaurants where the head waiters knew his sleek portliness; content just to stay home and listen to her enthusiasms— though the enthusiasms grew vaguer and vaguer, now that she was no longer under Guidance. For a month the excitement of resuming his old life continued. Then it seemed to him as though he had never been away, as though he had always, without break, been going along Washington Street to the Imperial Grill for his heavy lunches. Within two weeks after his return he was again accustomed to waking with a taste like quinine in his mouth. Within three weeks he had to have a cigarette before he got the energy to dress in the morning. And by the time he was quite accustomed to being back he was beginning to feel dissatisfied with everything except Beulah. His greatest tenderness for her played about the fact that she was still under the sway of Professor Tonson. Though she had no more communications from him, no Revelations, she was to be found unhappily reading his books—books in black covers, apparently printed by the office boy and bound by the porter; books with titles like Soul-Breathing, and The Occultism of Optimism. Packard was so pitiful toward her unchanged faith that it became horrible to him that he should be in partnership with the professor to make money out of the virtue of fools. He broke off the partnership abruptly in a short dictated letter. Tonson came up to Boston to protest. Packard told him—you know, of course, where the simple-hearted Packard told him to go; and he said: "I'm going to have my hands as clean as I can, now, Tonson. And don't smile that hyena smile of yours, or it'll cost me a tendollar police-court fine—and money's tight just now." Packard went home and told Beulah the full truth about Tonson and himself. She heard him out dumbly, her eyes averted. Then, "Thank you for telling me," was all she said; and she went to her room. . . . For the first time since, as a child, she had begun to potter about theories with her pervasively credulous father, she had no prophet. And she was convinced of Tonson's frauds. She was keen enough, once she had the clew. Packard's life with her had been easy enough hitherto. He had merely to agree with her enthusiasms. Now she had no enthusiasms and he could not create them for her. While she patiently and changelessly smiled, he tried to interest her in motoring, in the theater of the Tired Business Men. Sometimes she seemed aroused by his suggestions. Then he was happy. Betweenwhiles he hammered at his office work. There, at least, he could get results. But when spring came even this last comfort departed. Packard constantly pic- tured the shore line and the dunes at the Nature Colony; he imagined the stimulus of a plunge in the surf; he hated the stale air of the city. So at last, though he still wore the uniform of Mr. William Packard, captain of business, he envied the ridiculous Brother Packard and almost cried like a small boy for the impossible return of the happy days of the Colony. And his humble attitude toward Beulah changed. A small thing began it—though for weeks he had been saying: "I've got to do something for the little girl." When he came home to their apartment on an April evening with a smell of spring


Lewis - Nature, Inc
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