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1915_08_28--016_SP [No Dividends]

The Patented Red Plug Prevents Slipping THE SATURDAY EVENING POST TDEVE.DENDO (Continued from Page 18) 33 name of Mr. Williams, whom both knew by reputation, on his lips when they met the next morning. "Why didn't we think of him before?' they asked each other. That same day telephone messages from President Frank A. Vanderlip, of the City National Bank of New York, and President Frederick D. Underwood, of the Erie Railroad, and a telegram from Ralph Van Vechten, vice president of the Continental and Commercial Bank of Chicago, all of whom had been consulted about the commission's treasurership, advised Mr. Bates to read up on Mr. Williams in the Panama book. Mr. Williams had become treasurer of a large Chicago concern, which does a business of $26,000,000 a year in railroad and automobile supplies. An emissary was sent to this company, who by the exertion of strenuous diplomacy succeeded in borrowing Mr. Williams for the commission for a few months. He finds his duties with the commission far heavier than they were in Panama, where he disbursed only $2,000,000 a month as against $10,000,000 a month in his present position. Under a system perfected by Mr. Williams the stupendous finances of the commission are handled with less friction than those of the average corner grocery, and a daily audit of its voluminous and complicated accounts is made possible. This daily audit is made by one of the bestknown firms of chartered accountants in the world, whose representative in the New York office of the commission, A. M. McVie, is in charge of its accounting department. Efficiency in Handling Mail Handling hundreds of thousands of contributions, ranging from thousands of dollars to a few cents and from a pair of mittens to a shipload of wheat, the employees of the commission perform their duties under a system whereby it seems impossible to divert one cent of value from its purpose. The method of handling the mail will serve as an illustration. All letters are delivered in the executive department and opened in the presence of Mr. Williams, each envelope being numbered with a numbering machine before it is opened, by mail clerk number one. The envelope is opened by mail clerk number two, who with an identical numbering machine, numbers the inclosures—one or more—with the number on the envelope. The inclosures are then passed on to mail clerk number three, who stamps them with the executive office stamp and sends them on to the registry clerk. The registry clerk enters the number of the inclosure, the name of the sender and the sender's address in the mail book. If there is a check, money order or currency inclosed, the amount is entered and initialed by the registry clerk. Mail clerk number one now delivers money orders, checks and money to the cashier in the accounting department, who also initials the amounts set down in the mail book in acknowledgment of receipt, and enters them in his cashbook. Money orders, checks and currency are deposited in bank the same day and the total bank deposit must agree with the amount shown by the mail register. The letters are handed to a secretary of executives, who stamps on them the titles of the departments to which they are to be delivered and dispatches them thither by mail clerks numbers two and three. The envelopes are retained in the executive department in the event of possible inquiries as to any of the letters. The clerks in the executive department, as well as all other employees of the commission in responsible positions, are under heavy bonds. The name of Lindon W. Bates on her bill of lading will take a vessel into any open port in the world; but in order to prevent the detention of the relief ships by the naval authorities of the belligerent nations a considerable length of red tape is essential. Before the German consul at the port of sailing notifies the Ambassador at Washington that a vessel is entitled to a safeconduct pass, he requires her captain to make a personal affidavit to the same effect, and also to make oath that he "will abstain from any and all actions on the outgoing and homeward voyage involving assistance to any government at war" while his ship is under charter to the commission. The relief ships are further safeguarded from the sea-raiders of the governments at war by a white flag, twelve feet square, at the masthead, on which is inscribed in red letters, "Commission for Relief in Belgium"; long banners bearing the same legend being attached to their decks and sides. The commission issues these special instructions to its shipping agents at all ports: "Erase, before loading, any shipping marks referring to the Belgian Consul or any other officials of governments at war, and any other marks or messages that could possibly be construed as unneutral or mistaken for a code message. Your attention is particularly directed to this, as the most innocent mark or message may be suspected and hold up the distribution of an entire consignment." How less than a hundred men—all Americans with the exception of four Spaniards—composing the Commission for Relief in Belgium, tdok on themselves the feeding and clothing of an entire nation, is a story of altruism that perhaps will not be fully appreciated until the present conflict of arms is viewed in perspective; it is possible that then the world will consider America's response to the appeal of the starving Belgians the most glorious event of these hateful times. Others helped—Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Queensland, New South Wales, Holland, Spain, Italy, China—the wealthy and the well-to-do among the Belgians cooperated with the commission to save their own people; but, to quote the historian of the commission, "America fairly leaped into the breach and with her own body, as it were, defended Belgium's civil population from famine and cold." When the war began Belgium was the most densely populated and highly industrialized state in Europe. Her people numbered about 7,800,000; they covered an area of 11,373 miles, 667 to the square mile. The population of the United States is 31 to the square mile; that of France, 189; of Germany, 310; of the United Kingdom, 374. At the time of her invasion three-quarters of the people of Belgium supported themselves by commerce, exchanging their products across their borders for food. How dependent the country was on trade with her neighbors is shown by the fact that her exports and imports were nearly three times as great a head as those of France or Germany; under normal conditions she imported sixty per cent of her food, The occupation of this intensely developed industrial state by a hostile army, taken in conjunction with the siege of the invading army and incidentally of the civil population by other military forces, created a situation unparalleled in history. The railroads were taken over entirely for military use, and the telephone, telegraph and post-office systems were discontinued. Rebuilding Shattered Credit The industries of the country were dependent almost entirely on imported raw material and on coal supplies, which in turn depended on railroad transportation; and, there being no railroad transportation, and exports absolutely ceasing, the industrial population was thrown out of employment. Credit was nonexistent and the metallic currency disappeared. The invasion took place at harvest time; but, even had there been no destruction due to military occupation or consumption of food by the army of occupation, the wheat harvest would have supplied bread for a period lasting not later than the end of October. The Belgians rose to the occasion when the Commission for Relief in Belgium offered to help them to help themselves. "How much money can you raise toward averting the starvation of your people?" was the first question the toimnission asked them. The leading men of the distressed nation responded with the offer of all they had—the remnants of their shattered fortunes. Belgian banks and institutions got together $3,000,000, which constitutes the fund out of which are paid the carrying charges to Rotterdam of all purchases and donations, from whatever part of the earth they may have come, thus making it possible to devote every dollar contributed in money or food value directly to the Belgian stomach. Belgium's former capitalists and men of wealth turned over all their securities negotiable Paint serves two ends: it protects the house and improves its looks. The appeal is to your pocketbook and to your pride. One ingredient added to paint will serve both these purposes. That ingredient is Stipulate this to the painter who is going to get the job. We have three books discussing Zinc from the three viewpoints of the parties most concerned. For House Owner: "Your Move" For Architects: "One of Your Problems" For Painters: "Zinc That Made. a Painter Rich" Ask for yours. Sent free. 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1915_08_28--016_SP [No Dividends]
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