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1951_05_26--025_SP [Petticoat Empire]

take Louise gariffwt. eaKacia's G.cleiez /teak for kemk, INN I.. • 11•••••••••••••••1 ROI I I • • • • • am • • • •• • • o• • ' I It • 2,i••11 11 a I AY.:. • "Our vacation got off to a 'magic carpet' beginning aboard a Canadian Pacific train. From our air-conditioned room we saw new, exciting scenery...soaring mountain ranges... swift-running rivers. We traveled in perfect comfort...slept in soft, wide berths... feasted on superb food. "No wonder Lake Louise is world famous! ...jade-green waters... magnificent Victoria Glacier... mountains nudging the sky. We went trail-riding...swam in the glacier-fed swimming pool. Chateau Lake Louise was our luxurious headquarters. Delicious food, comfortable rooms... grand service. We danced every night. "Arriving at Banff Springs—our next Canadian Pacific 'stopover' — we found one of the world's finest golf courses... fast tennis courts...two beautiful pools. A 'chair lift' ride up Mt. Norquay was a special thrill! Canadian Pacific service... friendly, hospitable... made every hour perfect. It was a vacation we'll never forget!" eadfC SPANS THE WORLD Railways • Steamships . Airlines • Hotels . Communications • Express 1;7E''• "Our local travel agent arranged all details...so helpfully. Next year we plan to vacation in Canada again...explore the Great Lakes... visit Victoria on the Pacific coast." SEE YOUR LOCAL AGENT OR CANADIAN PACIFIC IN PRINCIPAL CITIES IN U S. AND CANADA Arivn vas "Must I hale ever. advantage you didn't have when you were a kid?" THE SATI'IDAY F\'{:\ ,• THE SATURDAY EVENING POST important in a man's life, but even more important was a story to its author. Her production meeting on Menu 1 for Joe Frane took most of the afternoon. She wrote, edited and rewrote without regard to budget. She left the office early to pick up the items and don a dimity apron. Her guests arrived at seven. Zwinnick, previously unsuccessful at getting his foot in the door, was charmed with the apartment. Joe was noncommittal, although he appeared lazily comfortable in the lounge chair that fitted his long frame without coaxing. Mentally Nathalie put on his slippers and asked him if he'd had a hard day at the office. Her program called for no shop talk until after coffee. Then they would read and discuss the script, Zwinnick would grow mellow over the brandy and walnuts, and she would lay the money problem, oh so tactfully, in his well-upholstered lap. Everything was proceeding famously and ... zingo! During the few moments it took her to remove the dinner plates and bring in the salad, her program was kicked out the window. Zwinnick announced he had read the script and the production price was too high. "Let's talk about it later," she said, but no one paid any attention. Joe pushed his salad aside and got busy with a pencil and notebook. "Since you feel one thousand's too much, look at it this way, Mr. Zwinnick. We're featuring all your products that the housewife uses in her daily routine. Wall cleaner, beauty soap and kitchen soap have about forty per cent of the footage. Lotion has sixty per cent. Divide a thousand that way and you come out six hundred dollars for Babyskin." "Yes, but our other divisions have no appropriations for theater ads." "Their television movies are theater ads. It's only the medium that's different." Joe bored in. He tossed off television costs and theater advertising costs like an automatic calculator. He wrapped up a television-theatrical package and presented it over his untouched salad. May 26, 1951 Still too much money," Zwinnick said. Nathalie was crushed. Why hadn't Joe let her handle it in her own way? Perhaps it wasn't too late even now. She stretched her hand across the table. "Mr. Zwinnick," she said. "Ferd." Smiling his surprise, Zwinnick took her hand. "This picture could make you the biggest man in sales-promotion advertising. You've always been a leader, but with a brand-new idea like this you'd be the absolute top." Out of the corner of her eye she saw Joe's face. It looked slightly sick. Zwinnick said, "I know, my dear, but we'll have to do our regular version this time. I'm going to think it over, though. It has possibilities." Joe smiled. He slipped his notebook into his pocket. "That's good enough for me, Mr. Zwinnick." Men! Folding up and calling it quits before each and every expedient had been tried. She said pleadingly, " We want to do this one picture so very much. It will be a big feather in Joe's cap, and I want it too. It's real theater and I've never had a chance to do anything like it before." Zwinnick gave her hand a quick squeeze. "Let's do it, then! Anything you want, Nathalie, even if it takes money out of my own pocket! Sure, let's do it!" Nathalie turned triumphantly to Joe. What she saw was a frozen corpse, its eyes glassy, its jaws clamped in a mighty disapproval. The telephone rang and she answered it. "For you, Mr. Zwinnick." Zwinnick got up and went into the living room. He said loudly, "Zwinnick speaking. . . . Who? . . . J. B.? Where are you? . . . Oh, I get it. Over." It went on and on. It didn't make sense. She cleared the table and stacked the plates on the kitchen drain board. She heard a step behind her and felt an iron grip bearing down on her shoulders, spinning her around. She looked up into the flashing blue anger of Joe Frane's eyes. "Bar none," he said, "that was the cheapest trick I ever saw pulled anywhere." (Continued on Page 96)


1951_05_26--025_SP [Petticoat Empire]
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