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The_War_of_Lies_and_Laughs

72 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST February 3,1940 AT PLAY OFTEN GET LITTLE CUTS AND SCRATCHES. WHEN THEY DO AND CUTS NEED BANDAGING.. USE A READYMADE BAND-AID INSTEAD OF FUSSING AROUND WITH AWKWARD, HOME-MADE BANDAGES 1,3AND-AID 15 NEAT AND CONVENIENT. JUST STICK ONE ON... AND IT STAYS... EVEN ON HARD-TOBANDAGE PLACES. BUY A BOX TODAY AND HAVE IT READY. CGDEliduoloo ADiffsivE GAUZE FOR 36 ASSORTED SIZES laftscrytiani4on BAN D-Al D REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. ADHESIVE BANDAGES A KICK IN THEPANTS for WINTER MOTOR WEAR RYTHM the no mechanico/ strength of even premium gr atudnee m-uopt,o irn coriel a2s0e tsim fielms and protects against coid weather starting wear. RYTHM gives motors summer pep and power on winter free long because it keeps vales, pistons and rings from carbon, gum, sludge, and motor arnish. Cuts gas and oil bills as much as 7.5%. cRAI. MMDE. NH, OLLINGSHEAD CORP. N. J. TORONTO, CAN. 98 CAR BEAUTY AND MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS TRAVEL THE LUXURY ROUTE VIA COVERED WAGON aCraer elofnregee,r ,l uwxidueriro, uhsig lhiveinr.g C aotm lopwle tceo isnt !e Cveorvye dreetda iWl foarg yoena'sr 1'r9o4u0n dM loivdinegls. Fnuelwly iellquustiprapteedd alitt e$r4a9tu5r teo— 0o1r,4 s4e0e. Cyohuoric nee oafr essixt dCisotvinecrteivde W siazegdo.n W Drietaelfeorr. COVERED WAGON COMPANY, 329 Cass Avenue, Mt. Clemens, Michigan MOST FOLKS PREFER THESE DELI CIO US OATS, AND THEY COSI NO MORE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY During the next 60 days we expect to appoint a number of reliable middle age men as Distributors in several hundred counties. Desire men who can operate car and also do service business with old and new customers. Connection offers opportunity for steady and profitable year around business. No high pressure salesmen desired. Large nationally known concern. Write details, age, former work, and reference. Address your reply to Manufacturer, P. 0. Boa 983—Dept. 2-50, Dayton, Ohlo ABSORBENT TOWELS.TOWELING etiBOOTT MILLse- HELP WANTED and reannedw walo smubesnc rwipatinotnesd ftoor forward new Tke Saturday Evening Post, Ladies' Home Journal, COS/miry Gentleman. Jack 13,¢ Commissions. Devote spare time or full time. For detailsa wnrdit eJ itlol. CURTIS PUBLISHING COMPANY, 343 Independence Square, Phila., Pa. MEND IT4oza aAn LeasIyQ waUytoI mDen dM or EbinNd FDABERICRS, LEATHER, WOOD. METAL. GLASS. heaht,ewaatte ro arn tdo aoirl.s R reepaqirsetda pnadrtss 1s1t1ro1EnTgAeLr heat, LtIhCa•Xn abt eafllo required.greoo md ehnarddiwnga. Withstands r eA sstkor feosr. Only 35t a tube. (Continued from Page 70) likely to get himself quoted gleefully and at length on the German radio. Father Coughlin's Social Justice, identified as "an American newspaper," is a favorite. So is Walter Millis' Road to War and that English-written and published volume called Propaganda in the Next War. Stuart Chase is a fine fellow because he wrote The New Western Front, and lauded wholesale along with him are Herbert Hoover, Senator Nye and Senator Borah, all of whom have had the indiscretion to express opinions suiting the German purpose. Similarly, George Bernard Shaw, Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin and H. G. Wells are liberally quoted by the German radio to show what even Englishmen think of themselves. The climax comes when Abraham Lincoln is drafted to discredit English propaganda—you can fool some of the people all of the time, and so on. Americans are also invited to visit a swank Berlin hotel by a charming American girl with a fetching beerand pretzels accent. Why, you can hardly tell there is a war on. Nice room with bath, quite inexpensive. Just give your ration card to the clerk and order whatever you like. At table, in fact, the young lady acts like Diamond Jim Brady's favorite niece; the menu is stiff with lobsters, oysters, crab, turtle soup—real, not mock, says the captain with pride—venison and pheasant. At the bar, German whisky and gin are brilliantly replacing English products. When the little lady orders a "white penguin," the barkeep has all the ingredients and knows how to make it, which is more than an American barkeep would. Since the place is running over with heavy-spending Italians, Hungarians and Scandinavians, British and American tourists of the pitches connected into a route to the top. Griffith and his companions passed the baton on to the Sierra Club in the relay against Shiprock, and started back to Montrose. How soon must we pass the baton along? We had just four days in which to endeavor to carry it to the top. The route situation, as we now saw it, was briefly this: Shiprock culminated in three high pinnacles—the north and south towers, and between them the much-sought summit tower. All were completely isolated from the desert, except the north tower, the base of which could be attained only by a basalt gully on the west. The summit tower, in turn, could be approached only from the east—from a bowl at the top of a deep gully honeycombed with overhangs. No one had yet entered even the gully, not to mention the bowl. Griffith, Ormes and party had hoped to climb over the north tower and rope down into the bowl, but the tower would have none of it. They saw another possibility—a steep chimney dropping northeast from the base of the north tower. Climbing a crag, they looked down this chimney, then concluded it would only drop them down among the caves of the honeycomb gully. Those caves were reserved exclusively, they knew, for birds in good physical condition. "But our not having actually explored that chimney," Griffith had said, "has kind of stuck in my craw ever since." aren't missed. "Dear listeners overseas," says the young lady, "this is wartime Germany. Just listen to the music, and it will give you the answer." The music is gay enough; but playing a tune known in America by the title of Jeepers Creepers. Sometimes a valid note is struck. Denouncing British charges that Himmler, head of the Gestapo, arranged the Munich bomb, the Germans ask Americans how they would feel if somebody tried to bomb President Roosevelt and the British said J. Edgar Hoover was behind it. Commenting on the American embassy's bomb trouble in Warsaw, they want to know just how it would make sense for them to look the embassy up on a map and then deliberately bomb it to make sure Americans will get mad and maybe enter the war against them. Once in a blue moon an actual sporting gesture appears: German denials of damage in British air raids on naval bases followed by insistence that they do not want to belittle the British airman: "We remember from the last war that he is courageous and really excellent." Or the generous British praise of the way the Graf Spee's skipper handled his ship. But as it rolls out of the loud-speaker, day after day, the general effect is to make you ashamed of the human race for ever having invented speech. Perhaps a sounder attitude was expressed last December by Rome's short-wave station in English. The British had just announced the loss of three British and four German planes in an air battle. The Germans were claiming a dozen British and only one German lost. Just better leave it lay, friends, said Rome wearily. Aviators' reports on what happened can't conceivably be accurate. Just leave it lay till the end of the war, and then maybe we'll find out what actually did happen. Monday morning found us at the base of the north tower, from which Ormes had fallen. We had, figuratively, stood upon the shoulders of the Colorado men to reach this point, and could now fairly evaluate their climbing ability. Apparently, our predecessors not only knew how to talk and write about climbing, but they could climb too. We would be the last to admit that we couldn't climb as high on the north tower as had the Coloradans. We might well be able to climb higher. But now the frowning overhangs of the tower convinced us that we didn't want to climb it at all, if we could help it. Not yet ready for the drive back through Arizona's desert wild flowers, I started down the chimney that was "sticking in Griffith's craw." The first 100 feet was a walk. The next 100 was a jump. Jumping is frowned upon in better mountaineering circles, especially downward jumps of such length. We would have to rope down from two pitons that could be driven into cracks above the jump. It would not be enough merely to tie a rope to the pitons and slide down. It must also be safe to come back up. This could be accomplished, of course, by climbing the rope hand over hand. But such procedure would leave no margin of safety. The slightest slip would result in a fall that might easily prove fatal. Rock Engineer Robinson invented an elevator. A short piece of rope was tied to both pitons, which were thus Modal estheidrs1 hat .ith 16,803 maininspini METALLIC-X. ET COULDN'T ES CLAW (Continued from Page 25)


The_War_of_Lies_and_Laughs
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