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War_Has_Lost_Its_Pockets

THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 57 AMIPIEWAY TO LOWER HAULING COSTS Truck Users In 100 Industries Have Proved This Method Practical! / ze-ed-Oite You know that a horse can carry only a few hundred pounds on its back, whereas it can pull many that much. t Likewise, a motor truck when coupled to a Trailer and used as a mechanical 4111.11M 6C% —o- • o can pull far more than it can carry. times horse cannot convert guns back into butter. So, therefore, that nation must make a desperate choice between two evils. One is to suffer an immediate economic disaster from demobilization, which will entail unemployment and then years of hard work and privation until new wealth can be created; the other is to release the war machine on its destructive and profitless errand. There was, it is true, a high emotional barrier against German goods. That was the boycott, in retaliation for her treatment of the Jews, and no doubt it did a great deal of harm to German trade. There the cause was not economic; the consequences were. And from this you come to a kind of wealth, imponderable and yet very important, that cannot be bought or sold. Since the great wealth of the modern world consists not in things that may be seized and dragged home, but in the continuity of process and exchange, in debits and credits, in the faith of contract, in mass production as a means and mass consumption as the end, none of which may be commanded by force, all of which are beyond the reach of conquest, it follows that the good will of neighbors is itself a priceless commodity. It has been cultivated more or less; never has it been conquered. But the toughest of all surviving delusions are those concerning trade as a rational object of conquest, comprehending ideas such as economic empire, colonies to exploit, preferential markets, pathways of one's own to the sources of raw material and then to the customer. One must allow, however, that if such ideas as these now are obsolete in reason, or tending to become so, that was not always to be said of them. Not long ago, they were valid enough. They were valid for Great Britain while she was founding her empire. What happened to them, briefly, was that the world passed from what, in the language of the economist, is called an economy of scarcity to an economy of plenty; and that has taken place within one lifetime. It may be strange that one of the splendid visions of a world of amicable well-being and wealth beyond conquest occurred in Germany. I was there during the second year of the World War. The man I most wanted to see was Walther Rathenau, because he was the economic director, with absolute power over physical resources, and my errand was to find out, if I could, whether it was true or not that Germany's material means to war were about to be exhausted. Those who might have performed the office of introduction were discouraging. They said I might as well be wanting to see the Kaiser. So I sent a note around to him, and the answer was that I might come in the next morning at ten, for half an hour. A Window in Berlin It was winter. Snow was falling. He was alone in his office and the temperature was uncomfortably low. We stood at the window looking out, and that made it seem warmer inside. I had expected to meet an industrialist, for he was head of the celebrated German electric industry founded by his father. Or I had expected to meet a great administrator, and that he was. I knew also that he was an engineer, and that as a chemist he had made important discoveries. But his faculties exceeded all of that. He was statesman, philosopher, thinker, seer of forms that have not yet arrived—one of the rare imaginative minds of his time. I do not recall how it was that the conversation took a certain turn at the beginning. Lunch was forgotten. At dark, the snow still falling, as it may in Berlin all day long without leaving its coat, we were yet at the window. What had we been talking about? Not the war. I remember that as we went on, the war seemed a thing misplaced in time, meaningless in itself. Whether Germany's resources would permit her to go on for a month, a year, two years—what difference did it make? Sometime it would end, and then the problem would be what it was before. How shall competitive people live together in the world, now all shut up in it, no insulating partitions of space, solitude or silence between them, yet obliged to be continuously dividing it, else retreat into barbarism? Afterward he put some of it down in a book entitled, In Days to Come. A Lost Vision Here was a man bending the physical power of Germany to the breaking point in order to wage a nationalistic war, because that was his job, and at the same time dreaming the outlines of an international world. Not a world without nations in it. Not anything like a universal utopia. No, nor a socialistic world. But a symbiotic, or a living-together world, in which those having special traits of mind and hand, and the materials appropriate, should produce certain things for all, and exchange them for unlike things produced by others in the same way, which would be trade on a basis of mutual and equal satisfaction. Trade of that kind, besides increasing the satisfactions, would save so much—saving, that is to say, the cost of senseless competition, the waste of duplication and, most of all, the cost of war and armaments—that in a time to come the human race might be truly and responsibly rich. He saw, perhaps, the luminous phantom of it only. There would need to be at the same time a change in the philosophy of government, and he had not thought that problem through. Nevertheless, a moment of vision in the chasm of that war becomes a movement of thought in the chasm of this one, and now the American Secretary of State and the British Prime Minister are talking with one idea of a world of "full trade," beyond aggression. It is the same theme. While the World War lasted.. Rathenau's genius for administration made him indispensable to his country. Afterward, serving her in statesmanship and representing her in foreign affairs, his dream became a liability. It was not a German dream. The German instinct turned against him, as it was bound to do, and in 1922 he was assassinated. How inevitable that was, then or later, is now apparent. The German sense of destiny is to be, not a people in the world but a world people; the German idea of trade is to conquer it by force. Hence Hitler. So now we speak of trade. It is the last defense of war pretending to be an economic enterprise. Consider, first, how all ideas of trade as a rational object of conquest imply one thing—namely, the power to take advantage, so that in the exchange of goods you will receive more than you give, else there is no profit in it. Trade in that character was a vast improvement over piracy and pillage, yet thanks for this much more to common /Caralla' THE FRUEHAUF -Truck-Trailer" method of hauling has been adopted by truck users in more than 100 lines of business. Chief among these users are professional haulers whose income depends solely upon their houling costs. Whatever your business the "Truck-Trailer" method may be just what you, too, can use more economically. Savings In First Cost To Start With You're sure to save on first cost. Instead of buying a truck with the capacity needed to carry your loads, you select a smaller truck, add a Fruehauf Trailer and pull your loads. The price of the smaller truck and Trailer is much less than that of a larger truck of equal capacity—on an average one-third less. Now Come Still Greater Savings Your fuel cost will be lower—as much as 30"0 less—because the truck you use to pull your Fruehauf Trailer is smaller. Your upkeep cost will be lower for the smaller truck. Savings here may be as high as 35' , . Your depreciation will be less since the smaller truck will cost only one-half as much. You'll have a smaller investment to write off initially and when you replace it. The Fruehauf Trailer is good for ten years or more. Many Fruehauf owners have reduced their total depreciation costs as much as 50' , . Think of it! Add "Plus" Advantages "Shuttle- Operation: With one truck you can handle several Fruehauf Trail- ers. You simply leave one or more Trailers to be loaded or unloaded and use the truck to do a full-time job of pulling first one and then another of the Trailers ready to be moved. Flexibility : A Truck-Trailer, "pivoted in the middle" as it is, can be turned in a circle one-third smaller than that required for a truck of equal carrying capacity. Your driver can get it in tight places easier, more quickly. Advertising Value: The large, smooth sides of a Fruehauf Trailer can be used for a dominating display of your name, trade-mark or advertising message . . the ''Truck-Trailer" story is one of savings from start to finish. Facts To Help You You can get detailed facts by sending for the booklet -Executive Thinking.- It's yours upon request. Or just say the word and a Fruehauf man, a competent transportation engineer, will gladly help you determine if Truck-Trailers will do for you what they are doing for so many others. World's Oldest and Largest Manufacturers of Truck-Trailers FRUEHAUF TRAILER CO. • DETROIT Sales and Service In Principal Cities 'm one of the more than 3,500,000 "I ivIng Americans who earn thew. lwork diving motor trucks. Our contributes to greater lower \ prosperity and living costs for all," HilarlAWIRS eCee4e.4/ 77a (130a.e4Zie " RIG. U. S MT OFF. MORE FRUEHAUF TRAILERS ON THE ROAD THAN ANY OTHER MAKE


War_Has_Lost_Its_Pockets
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