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The Evolution of Dentifrices It is a fine art to make a perfect dentifrice— one which will clean and polish without scratching— which will fulfill in a thorough and harmless manner the meaning of the word Dentifrice—"dental-friction." It was not so long ago that dentifrices generally contained infusorial earth, cuttle-bone, pumice and other bases, all far too harsh for the delicate enamel of the teeth, which, once injured, cannot be restored by nature. In time these materials were largely discarded and the less harshprecipitated chalk became the accepted base of the better dentifrices. Colgate & Company, not satisfied with the best chalk to be bought on the open market, experimented in their laboratories until they had perfected a chalk free from sharp, angular particles; -a chalk that will cleanse and polish without scratching. We make only enough of this for use in our own dentifrices—and so far as we know, we are the only manufacturers who make their own base. This is an evidence of the care used in making Ribbon Dental Cream. In advertising—as in manufacturing—we choose scrupulously. What we say about Ribbon Dental Cream is as conscientiously examined as what we put into it. Efficiency with safety characterizes the making — efficiency with truth characterize the advertising. Every advertisement is written with the hope that after reading you will test its truth of the statement. As you do so, you have our word that it is true. Colgate's Ribbon Dental Cream does six things—and does them well. 1—Checks the growth of decay-germs. 2 — Corrects an acid condition of the mouth. 3 — Delights by its delicious flavor. 4 — Cleans thoroughly without injurious chemicals. 5 — Polishes the teeth to natural whiteness without harmful grit. 6 — Leaves the mouth wholesome and the breath pure. Precipitated Chalk made a great change But all precipitated chalks are not alike Colgate's base is safe And the advertising is truthful Ribbon Dental Cream does six things COLGOTE'S RIBBON DENTAL CREAM is a complete dentifrice—you too should use it. Sold everywhere—or a generous trial tube sent on receipt of 4c in stamps. COLGATE & CO., Dept. P, 199 Fulton St., New York Established 1806 5,„ SHEET M USIC Makers of Cashmere Bouquet Soap—luxurious, lasting, refined. CENTURY EDITION The World's ItestM usie —10c a copy The Masterpieces. the Old Favorites and the better known Classics. Printing, fingering, phrasing and editing the best. Ask your dealer to show you the edition and give you complete catalog of 1700 "Century.' selections. If he don not carry the line, send us his name lOs and we'llsend you complete catalog Fres. 135 W. 40th St., New York OT CENTURY MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. THE SANITARY "0. K." ERASER includvs an Adjustable Metal Holder. Two Rubbers are made, best quality; one for T y pewr iter and Ink, one for Pencil. Tht•se rubbers last 6 months to a year, T he I folder a lifetime. By slight pressure, clean rubber is fed down until used; its narrow edge allows a letter or line to be erased witbontinjutinganotber. Prlselfle Rallis Sc. ALL STATIONERS Everybody should have this New Eraser By mad 2c extra. Booklets free. THE 0. E. MFG. CO., Brutus, N.Y. LEARN TO FLY AVIATIIOONN now an established business, AVIAT unusual advantages. Good pilots needed everywhere. Enroll now wit*, the Curtiss Training School, largest it the world. Write for illustrated literatu YOUR OPPORTUNITY Oeig-CZATI tali A kftliWILAIS4Aill.. 1200 Niagara St., BUFFALO. PL. March 6, 1915 Top Notch Boot. Made by a new process— from selected rubber — which assures you of extra • wear. Double thick gum sole, extra heavy outside vamp reinforcement and patented ribbed legs. MISS IrV1TES 5P01v)-r'' You Fifty mountain takes, hundreds of foaming, dashing trout creeks —miles of winding auto roads— all the attractions of the ever- green summer playgroundof America join in second- ing the invitation. Your trip to the California expositions Is planned that you may also see the beauties and the opportunities of the Pacific Coast. For your comfort. enjoyment q and future knowledge of this great part of our country you will wish to visit Spokane and the Inland Empire between the Cascade Mountains and the Rockies; a region as vast as from the Potomac to the St. Lawrence and naturally richerand more beautiful. 141-1S Spokane wishes you to enjoy that Pacific Coast trip. She has organized a service to answer your Questions, to help you Pan Your route and to be of use to the stranger in a new land. Write for Travel Book D Travel Service Bureau, Spokane, Work. W21 R93 12 'd2! (Continued from Page 8) have been an epic—What may some day become an epic for poets to write about and school-children to learn about—was only an incident. In an earlier article of this series I wrote a little something about her—the seventeenyear old daughter of a well-to-do citizen of the little Belgian town of Dolhaim—who, when the Germans set up their guns in the village to fire them at Liege, stayed in her father's empty house after the rest of the family had fled, risking the loss of her life by the fire of her own people and at the hands of her people's enemy, if they caught her, in order that she might hourly telephone to the commandant of Fort Loncin in Liege as to how he should train his cannon in order to destroy the greatest number of the intrenched besiegers. The Germans had somehow neglected to tear down that private telephone line and she used it for two days and nights—so I was told. Then they did catch her. They tried her by court-martial for giving aid and comfort to the Belgians, and found her guilty; and the next morning that seventeen-year-old girl, with her hands tied behind her back and blindfolded, died against a brick wall. I never even learned her name; it is possible I never shall learn her name, but it seems to me, if history does her justice, she will be remembered in the hearts of future generations of men with Joan of Arc and Charlotte Corday. I remember another instance that helps to explain how faulty and imperfect is the news on the edges of the War Belt. I was told, first by an American consular official in Aix-la-Chapelle and subsequently by a German military surgeon, of another most lamentable tragedy, for which this same town of Dolhaim furnished the setting. Mrs. Bonar's Testimony I have previously mentioned this case also. It had to do with an elderly and invalided Scotchman, one of a party of British visitors fleeing from Germany in the first days after the invasion of Belgium, who, having lost their carriages, took refuge temporarily in the house of a Belgian customs officer named Blaise. According to the story, as I first heard it, somebody in that house fired on a passing squad of German soldiers, so the soldiers set fire to the house. They spared the women and children who came forth, but they shot and killed every male adult under that roof; and last of all they shot the aged and crippled Scotchman, McKenzie, as he crossed the threshold. It was months later, and I was back home in America, before I heard the other side of that grim story. A letter came to me, in care of THE SATURDAY EVENING POST, from a Mr. George Bonar, of Dundee, Scotland. His wife and two children, and the nurse of one of the children who had been ill, were included in the party that slept in the house of the customs officer, Blaise, on that fatal night. Mrs. Bonar's account, as narrated by her husband in his letter, put a new and different face on the thing. She declared that no shot was ever fired at the Germans from Blaise's house. If any shot was fired, she said, it came from the house next door, and she added that she explained in German the innocence of McKenzie to the officer who commanded the Germans, and begged him—literally on her knees—to spare the poor old Scotchman's life. I am prepared to believe that the direct evidence of Mrs. Bonar is true and honest evidence. I am equally certain that my earlier informants gave me what, at the time, they believed to be a correct recital of the killing. In debatable territory, or in conquered territory held by the enemy, the people learn to do without newspapers of any sort. In cities more remote from the sound of gunfire the people, with equal facility, learn to accept newspapers strangely transformed. I have seen a Cologne paper of which the entire back page, formerly devoted to tradesmen's advertisements, was entirely filled with black-slugged cards in memory of officers of regiments belonging to Cologne, who—so the language of the card always ran—had "died for King and Fatherland." And I have seen a Paris paper containing column after column of small four or Top Notch Rubber Footwear Boots that are toughest and strongest for every use in all kinds of weather. Arctics that are warm, sturdy and serviceable. Rubbers that fit perfectly, look well and last long. Whether you buy the boots, arctics or rubbers, you are sure of splendid service when you see the Top Notch Cross on the sole. That mark guar.. antees quality and satisfaction in rubber footwear. All styles and•sizes for men. women and children. Ask for Top Notch Footwear the next time you buy. Write for names of Beacon Falls dealers in your town and free copy of Booklet "S." BEACON FALLS RUBBER SHOE CO. Beacon Falls, Conn. Chicago Kansas City ANTED -AN IDEA! Who can think of some simple thing to patent? Protect your ideas, they may bring you wealth. Write for "Needed Inventions' and "How to Get Your Patent and Your Money." RANDOLPH & CO., Dept. 137, Patent Attorneys, Washington, D. C. . 40 THE SATURDAY EVENING POST New York San Francisco Boston Minneapolis


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