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—you know there is something wrong with your preventive measures. Absolute sanitary cleanliness is the only safeguard. Soap and water cleanliness is not enough. Use the disinfectant that Lysol is ideal for all household and personal uses. Physicians and nurses have relied on it for twenty years. The proof is that practically all of them choose it for maternity cases, where they must have the safest, most dependable. Lysol is five times more efficient and safer than carbolic acid; better in every way than bichloride of mercury. Three Sizes, 25c, 50c, $1.00 Sold by Druggists Everywhere Important—Be sure you get Lysol itself. It is put up in round bottles with the signature of Lehn & Fink on the label, Lysol is safe— will safeguard you; imitations' may not. Helpful Booklet "Home Hygiene" Mailed FREE Full of practical helps for preserving health. May we send a copy to you? Address LEHN & FINK Manufacturing Chemists 85 William St. New York - is used every day by every hospi- tal— • ft: An116eP Cata- lloogg L._teme Folding Canvas Boat Co., Miamisburg, Ohio THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 41 LIFE'S a great big game o' checkers— each one of us is a-movin' forward, an' Copyright 1915 10c Tins 5c Metal-lined bags One Pound Glass Humidors we can't go back. Ef we are wise, most of our losses are good for us. They teach us to puff our pipes a 1-e-e-t-l-e bit longer befo' we make our nex' move. An' we learn after awhile, that lots o' losses are jus' preparin' the way for some great big gains. An' of we play the game fa'r an' squar'— whether our game's bein' President o' the United States or raisin' tobacco—we'll crown ourselves king an' nobody can take the crown away from us. WE all know that Velvet Joe's advice is absolutely right, if we just could have an opportunity to think it over every time. That's where our good pipes come in. There's no clearer bugle-call to our wandering thoughts than a pipe filled with slow-burning, mellow VELVET. It adds wisdom to their councils of war, and sends them forth with renewed courage to the fight. That aged-in-the-wood smoothness of the Smoothest Smoking Tobacco is rich in healing-power when the day has gone against us. Then see that your pipe is full of VELVET, the best of Kentucky's Burley de Luxe, and that "thar's mo' upon the shelf." Send up a cloud of smoke to warn the forces of trouble and care that you and your pipe are prepared to defend yourselves. llaudieeuxe-07 REMARKABLE LYON & HEALY PIANO STYLE "K" $350 This instrument is the latest product of the great Lyon & Healy piano factories at Healy Station, Chicago. These factories are univer- ' sally acknowledged to be the finest in America: This Style " K" LYON & HEALY PIANO is absolutely the last word in piano building. You owe it to yourself to examine it. This piano is on sale in the warerooms of 373 leading piano dealers. Write for the name of the nearest dealer. We will send you a beautiful catalog. 31-49 East Adams Street Chicago five line notices, in every one of which somebody advertised for tidings of the whereabouts of a missing kinsman or kinswoman; a sister or a brother—even a child or a wife. In the last days of the German drive through Belgium to the sea, after the fall of Antwerp, I observed, as I skirted Holland on my way back to England, how the refugees, having no papers at all and no way of spreading the word, were writing on the sides of all the buildings along the Dutch frontier their own names, and with these the names of their own people from whom they were separated, in the poor hope that the lost ones, coming that way, might read the message and follow on. Indeed, almost the last memory I now preserve of the Belgian refugees has for its background a little cowshed in a little Dutch town, a mile or two over the border from Belgium. It is almost dark and it is drizzling rain. An old, old man—he must be nearly eighty— stands in the drip from the eaves. The shoulders of his Sunday-best coat are slick and luminous with wetness, and all his earthly possessions lie at his feet—a black umbrella, and a bundle tied up in a red tablecloth. In his right hand he holds a piece of chalk and in his left he holds matches. With one hand he scratches a match and with the chalk in the other he writes over and over again on the side of that little cowshed his name and the name of his old wife, from whom he is separated, probably forever. Our train pulls out and we leave him there, striking another sputtering match into a tiny spark and writing his wife's name again on the cowshed wall. I do not think I shall ever forget him, though he was but one of the smallest and least considerable by-products of this miserable industry called civilized warfare. WECIg. W0E2713172 E302,2* AWOMAN absorbs more sound than a man. Everybody has noticed how the presence of people in a bare auditorium or even a small room kills off the persistent echoes that follow any sound in the room when it is nearly empty. It has now been discovered that women are more absorbent of sound under these conditions than are men, which is possibly due to softer bodies. Perhaps this new contribution of science will be mostly useful to newspaper paragraphers; but the investigations that turned up this fact have most practical promise. It is now feasible for an architect to design a theater or meeting hall so that the acoustics will be good, and to know in advance that he has succeeded in his design. Professor Sabine, of Harvard, Dean of the Graduate School of Applied Science, has developed a method by means of models that will give the architect his opportunity. A model of the theater is made in cardboard, exactly in the right proportions, based on the architect's drawings for the proposed auditorium. A sound is then sent into the theater model from a point that represents the center of the stage. Photographs of the inside of the model are then taken in quick succession, from the top or back or front. By an apparatus which is fairly well known in laboratories the sound waves are made visible on the photographic plate, and photographs of the sound waves are taken. The series of photographs shows one main sound wave as it goes to the rear of the auditorium, and the various breaks and echoes, or rebounds from walls, columns or seats, just as they take place. With this information, and with the exact knowledge of sound absorption that Professor Sabine has developed, the architect can alter the arrangement so as to obtain the most desirable acoustics. Professor Sabine has sets of such photographs for many auditoriums—among them the New Theater, of New York. Just how sound is absorbed he has determined by a great many tests. An open window may be said to absorb all the sound that reaches it, or one hundred per cent. Hair felt will absorb nearly four-fifths of it; while brick and plaster, and various other bare building materials, absorb less than four per cent. .Men and women absorb a great deal—equal to two or three times as much as seat cushions, for instance. Professor Sabine has succeeded in discovering exactly what percentage of absorption may be expected from all common building materials and room contents.


Wars_Back_Fire
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