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Most Popular Post Contemporary Fiction of 2016

Published: December 28, 2016

The Saturday Evening Post continues to discover and publish the works of new, talented authors. Take a look at our most read contemporary fiction short stories.

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1. Zelda, Burning” by Celeste McMaster

Winner of the 2016 Great American Fiction Contest: At Highland Hospital, Zelda Fitzgerald found refuge from the world — but not from Scott. Read more »

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2. “Swindy Wagon and the Charidy Band” by Dakota James

Four children get a crash course in charity and capitalism in this satire from Dakota James. Read more »

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3. “Facts Concerning My Father’s Disappearance” by Sacha Idell

The mysterious circumstances around a father’s disappearance are catalogued by his child, with only token postcards, an abandoned suitcase, and a collection of miniature giraffe statues for guidance. Read more »

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4. “Welcoming Death” by Jake Teeny

Third runner-up in the 2016 Great American Fiction Contest: Was Perry really face to face with Death, or was it all just an elaborate dream? Read more »

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5. “The Eyes of Thomas Andrews” by Dan Reilly

John’s scale replica of the RMS Titanic was almost perfect, but the strange messages he receives over the radio may mean that it’s more than just a model. Read more »

An old mansion with specters floating about.

6. “The Parties Involved” by Elizabeth Jennings

Urged by his literary agent, a recently single author attends a Halloween party despite his better judgment. Read more »

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7. “The Magic Circle” by Ruth Knafo Setto

First runner-up in the 2016 Great American Fiction Contest: On a fall night in 1963, a young immigrant struggles to support his family and hold on to a dream. Read more »

Woman, man and child riding on a motorcycle

8. “A Short Ride to Mercy” by Jim Gray

Fifth runner-up in the 2016 Great American Fiction Contest: Sam didn’t become his dog until Marlene left. The older they got, the more they depended on each other — now more than ever. Read more »

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9. “Every Hero an Hombre, Every Wolf a Clown” by Doug Lane

In a Texas town where luchadores and clowns just don’t mix, one father risks exposing his double life to grant his son’s birthday wish in this fun story by Doug Lane.
Read more »

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10. “Five in the Fifth” by Eileen M. Hopsicker

Fourth runner-up in the 2016 Great American Fiction Contest: Working at the Evergreen Nursing Home, young Jerry Keller didn’t think much about the future until he met Millie.
Read more »

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