Post Puzzlers: January 25, 1873

Try our latest set of rebuses, riddlers, conundrums, and math puzzles.

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Each week, we’ll bring you a series of puzzles from our archives. This set is from our January 25, 1873, issue.

Note that the puzzles and their answers reflect the spellings and culture of the era.

 

BURIED RIVERS.

WRITTEN FOR THE SATURDAY EVENING POST

  1. No one should be disliked for honesty.
  2. Will Mr. Stobel be here to-day?
  3. The courier has arrived with a message.
  4. They are going to New Haven soon.
  5. The robbers were attacked and but few of the gang escaped.
  6. We cannot dismiss our industrious servant.
  7. There is snow on the top of the mountain.
  8. The cars will either stop at or near the city.
  9. Two negatives in the same sentence are equivalent to an affirmative.
  10. The engineer proceeded unaware of the danger ahead.
  11. The great fire destroyed many fine buildings.
  12. Do not fail to be here to-morrow.
  13. We started home as the steamboat arrived.
  14. Laura is in the house.
  15. After viewing the town I left for the country.
  16. In less than an hour the victory was gained.

Seaboard, N. C.   EUGENE.

 

RIDDLER.

WRITTEN FOR THE SATURDAY EVENING POST

My first is in chestnut, but not in wood.
My 2d’s in righteous, but not in good.
My 3d is in crystal, but not in glass.
My 4th is in vanish, but not in pass.
My 5th is in chosen, but not in preferred.
My 6th is in spirit, but not in word.
My 7th is in blossom, but not in flower.
My 8th is in rain drop, but not in shower.
And my 9th is in the Saviour’s natal hour.
My whole is a spell word without alloy,
And its echoes are thankfulness, peace and joy.

Baltimore, Md.  EMILY

 

REBUS.

A personage in heathen fable famed,
A rural poem by great Virgil named;
An instrument which shoemakers employ;
One-half of what all creatures here enjoy;
An ancient enemy of Israel’s race;
A canton which to Switzerland you trace;
A lovely female in verse paramount;
A story which our seamen oft recount.

Reader, observe the initials; they disclose
The demon of innumerable woes;
Oh, let him not approach your hearth, for he
Is the sure harbinger of misery.
The final letters of each word display
The finger-post which marks the only way
To heavenly regions of perpetual day.

 

ALGEBRAICAL PROBLEM.

WRITTEN FOR THE SATURDAY EVENING POST

A speculator bought a cow, an ox and a horse, paying $100 for all of them. He sold the cow for $30, and gained as much per cent on her as the horse cost him; the ox he sold for $36, and gained as much per cent on him as the cow cost him. Required—the price he paid for each.

ARTEMAS MARTIN.                   Erie, Erie Co., Pa.

 

NEIGHBORLY QUESTION.

WRITTEN FOR THE SATURDAY EVENING POST

Two neighbors were talking together of their respective ages. John said to William: “You know I am much the older. If the square of my age is added to the square of your age the sum of these squares will amount to 6,610; while the square of the difference between our ages is 676. By this tell me my own and your age.” How old was each?

PETER PLAIN.

 

CONUNDRUMS.

WRITTEN FOR THE SATURDAY EVENING POST

Why is a defeated man like wool? Because he is worsted.

What is the difference between accepted and rejected lovers? The accepted kisses the misses, and the rejected misses the kisses.

When does a lady drink music? When she has a pianoforte (piano for tea).

Why are conundrums like monkeys? Because they are troublesome.

When is wheat like a blunt knife? When it is sent to be ground.

ANSWERS

BURIED RIVERS

  1. Rhone; 2. Elbe; 3. Thames; 4. Ens; 5. Ganges; 6. Missouri; 7. Po; 8. Tornea; 9. Onega; 10. Duna; 11. Red; 12. Don-Obe; 13. East; 14. Raisin; 15. Nile; 16. Ourthe.

RIDDLE — Christmas.

REBUS—Jealousy—Religion:—JupiteR, EneidE, AwL, LI (fe), OG, UrI, SapphO, YarN.

ALGEBRAICAL PROBLEM—$20 for the cow. $30 for the ox, and $50 for the horse.

NEIGHBORLY QUESTION—John 69, and William 43 years.

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