Rockwell Files: After the Prom

In Rockwell's painting, "After the Prom," he used a masterful sense of staging, lighting, and careful execution to share with viewers his sense of an idealized world.

A soda jerk smells a teenager's corsage as she and her date get a drink of cola at the drugstore, following their high school prom.
(Norman Rockwell / SEPS)

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Rockwell freely admitted he painted “life as I would like it to be.” But in the case of this cover painting from May 25, 1957, it was no simple matter. It took a masterful sense of staging, lighting, and careful execution to share with viewers his sense of an idealized world.

He starts with the happiness of two young people as they enjoy a night of feeling “grown up.” He emphasizes the magic of the evening by contrasting them against the mundane world of a dingy truck stop.

A soda jerk smells a teenager's corsage as she and her date get a drink of cola at the drugstore, following their high school prom.
(Norman Rockwell / SEPS)

He draws attention to their youth and innocence by dressing both in gleaming white. And he sets them beneath a beam of light from above that illuminates them and the appreciative cook. They are undisturbed by other customers, and even though Rockwell puts a dirty floor beneath them, they seem set apart from the dark interior in this perfect moment. Rockwell even echoes the viewer’s reaction by adding a bemused truck-driving spectator. Like him, we might observe this unforgettable moment with a smile of recognition, and perhaps recollections of our own.

This article is featured in the January/February 2020 issue of The Saturday Evening Post. Subscribe to the magazine for more art, inspiring stories, fiction, humor, and features from our archives.

Featured image: Norman Rockwell / SEPS

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