Cartoons: Funny Money

We hope you get your money’s worth out of this mid-century cartoons!

Banker refusing to give a customer a loan

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Two women sit in a room with wallpaper that has dollar signs on it.
“I think it makes the room awfully pleasant to live in, don’t you?”
Brad Anderson
July 3, 1954

 

Woman speaks to her husband about their debt situation
“Now that you’re earning more, dear, I feel we can finally afford to be in debt.”
Mort Temes
May 15, 1954

 

Wife going through the family budget
“The solution to our financial problem is simple. You got to make more money.”
Bill King
April 24, 1954

 

Banker refusing to give a customer a loan
“I’ll try to be as brief as possible Mr. Denton. No.”
Al Johns
April 17, 1954

 

Doctor speaks to a patient in a hospital bed
“Sorry I brought up the matter of your bill yesterday.”
David Pascal
April 17, 1954

 

People sit in a bare, darkened room discussion their kids' college tuition
“And how are your children doing at college?”
Stan Fine
April 10, 1954

 

 

Man speaks to another on a park bench about money
“With me, money is no object. I haven’t any.”
Ken Duggan
April 9, 1955

 

Older citizen goes over his budget
“According to my figures, I could retire at sixty with an income of $239 per month.”
Bill Mittlebeeler
December 5, 1953

 

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Comments

  1. In re: No.8, that WAS my salary in 1954, $60 a week working as a reporter on a small down daily. I got by.

  2. I wish these cartoons could fix what the REAL cartoon figures in Washington D.C. are doing regarding money with their prolonged dance of torture, teasing, turning and burning of the suffering American public. Money and a smile here though, is nice.

    I love all 8 of them equally this week. In the case of number 8 though, $239 a month is better than it sounds. $1 then had the purchasing power of $9.70 in 2020, so $239 x $9.70 = $2,318.30. That also would mean $2,318.30 is really only worth $239 now. Our country needs a miracle from you, PLEASE God; we’re begging!

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