Cartoons: You’re the Boss

We go back to a time when desks were large, clothes were uncomfortable, and smoking was allowed!

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“You’ve caught me at a bad time, Rushmore. I’m in.”
Walter Goldstein
March 26, 1960

 

“Good heavens, Mr. Smithers! Have we had another resignation?”
March 13, 1954
Hal Anderson

 

“That’s my ultimatum, Mr. Bigelow. Either I get the raise or I get along on my present salary.”
Mort Temes
March 6, 1954

 

“I like the job fine, sir. My problem is to find something to do on the outside to earn a living!”
Frank Beaven
December 5, 1953

 

“I have nothing against you in particular, Fidgely. I despise all my employees.”
Geo Gately
October 8, 1960

 

“Richards, I’ve had my eye on you for some time. Mind swapping desks with someone else?”
Jeff Keate
October 4, 1958

 

“He’s gone to the doctor. His face hurts when he snarls.”
Walter Goldstein
October 1, 1960

 

“No raise, Durkin, but effective the fifteenth of next month you may start calling me by my first name.”
Chon Day
September 10, 1960

 

“Sorry to see you go, Jenkins. You’ll be hard to replace at the salary I’ve been paying you.”
Chas. Strauss
May 3, 1952

 

“Are you really quitting, Spangler? Or just saying that to brighten up my day?
Roy Fox
April 8, 1961

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Comments

  1. Yes, the humor in all of these is still relevant today. Whether that’s good or bad is up for debate. Regardless, it’s still an accomplishment with their all being from mid-century. I love the simplicity of the desks with just the phone and double pens sets.

    Only 3 cigars seen in the 10 cartoons. I remember smoking (allowed) indoors up to 1986, unfortunately. Oh, and the shirts and ties going well into the 90’s. The latter I didn’t mind.

  2. In my view Walter Goldstein’s cartoons are the best. They have an urbanity and pungency which makes me suspect he offered them first to The New Yorker. Their loss, the SEP’s gain.

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